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DHS staffer recognized for work with people who have developmental disabilities and mental illness

Ryan Trihey receives prestigious Award for Excellence

11/3/2017 11:30:10 AM

Contact:
For media inquiries only
Sarah Berg
Communications
651-31-4901
Sarah.Berg@state.mn.us 
 
Ryan Trihey, a direct support professional with the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), has been honored by the National Association for the Dually Diagnosed (NADD). He received the organization’s prestigious Direct Support Professional Award for Excellence today during NADD’s annual conference in Charlotte, N.C.
 
Trihey works with clients in DHS’s Minnesota Life Bridge Program in Hastings, which provides treatment in residential settings for adults who have developmental disabilities along with mental health or chemical dependency diagnoses.
 
“Ryan’s devotion to our clients and their personal growth is apparent to anyone who sees him in action,” says DHS Commissioner Emily Piper. “He’s a role model and an inspiration to his coworkers, who nominated him for the award.” 
 
NADD is a New York-based training and advocacy group that focuses on bridging the gap between the mental health and development disability service systems. The Award for Excellence is given each year to a direct support professional whose work has resulted in significant improvement in the quality of life for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health needs.
 
“Dedication, advocacy, compassion, competence, person-centered approaches, and collaboration. Ryan Trihey demonstrates all of these qualities,” says Dr. Robert J. Fletcher, NADD founder and CEO.
 
“I am beyond humbled to receive this award. I hope it draws attention to the work my colleagues at DHS and I do each day,” says Trihey. “Adults with developmental disabilities and mental illness want, need and deserve to participate in community life, not superficially but to the fullest possible extent. I’m honored to be part of this important work.”   
 
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