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Industrial Analysis

by Nick Dobbins
nicholas.dobbins@state.mn.us
July 2018

Monthly analysis is based on seasonally adjusted employment data. Yearly analysis is based on unadjusted employment data.*

Overview

Minnesota employers added 6,600 jobs (0.2 percent) in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. Private sector employers accounted for all of that growth, adding 7,600 jobs (0.3 percent) while public sector employers shed 1,000 jobs (0.2 percent). The payrolls of Goods Producers and Service Providers both grew on the month, adding 3,500 jobs (0.8 percent) and 3,100 jobs (0.1 percent), respectively. Over the year the state added 45,517 jobs (1.5 percent). This was a marked increase over May’s 1 percent over-the-year growth. June’s annual growth was spread among larger industry groups. Goods Producers added 13,317 jobs (2.9 percent), and Service Providers added 32,200 (1.3 percent). The private sector grew by 41,380 (1.6 percent), and the public sector grew by 4,137 (1 percent).

Mining and Logging

Employment in the Mining and Logging supersector held steady in June at 6,500 jobs. It was the fourth consecutive month at that level, after May’s estimate was revised down from 6,600. Annually Mining and Logging lost 88 jobs (1.3 percent). While small in total jobs lost, it was the largest proportional decline in any supersector in the state. It was the sixth consecutive month of over-the-year job losses for the supersector.

Construction

The Construction supersector added 1,500 jobs (1.2 percent) in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. However, May’s estimate was also revised downward from 1,600 to 700 jobs. Regardless, the increase marks the third consecutive month of over-the-month growth for the industry group. Annually the supersector added 4,744 jobs (3.6 percent). Every component sector saw job growth, although the most striking came in Specialty Trade Contractors, which added 3,814 jobs or 4.6 percent. Construction of Buildings added 584 jobs (2.1 percent), and Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction added 346 (1.7 percent). The supersector has had over-the-year job growth in every month back to April of 2013, save for one blip in April of this year where it declined by 1.4 percent, likely caused by uncharacteristically wintery weather.

Manufacturing

Employment in the Manufacturing supersector was up by 2,000 (0.6 percent) in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. Durable and Non-Durable Goods Manufacturers both added 1,000 jobs (0.5 and 0.8 percent, respectively). It was the sixth consecutive month of over-the-month job growth in the supersector. Annually Manufacturers added 8,661 jobs (2.7 percent). Durable Goods Manufacturers added 5,346 jobs (2.6 percent), and Non-Durable Goods Manufacturers added 3,315 (2.8 percent).

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment was up by 600 (0.1 percent) in June. Retail Trade contributed all of the growth, adding 900 jobs (0.3 percent) while Wholesale Trade lost 300 jobs (0.2 percent), and Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities employment was flat. On an annual basis the supersector added 5,035 jobs (0.9 percent). All three component sectors grew on the year. Wholesale Trade added 1,473 jobs (1.1 percent), all of it among durable goods wholesalers as nondurable goods wholesalers lost 229 jobs (0.5 percent). Retail Trade added 2,717 jobs (0.9 percent), and Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities added 845 (0.8 percent).

Information

Employers in the Information supersector added 900 jobs (1.8 percent) in June. However, May’s estimate was revised down from a gain of 100 to a loss of 100, breaking the consecutive over-the-month growth streak the supersector had been on since March. Annually Information employment was up by 508 (1 percent). However, both published component sectors lost jobs. Publishing Industries (except Internet) lost 519 jobs (2.7 percent), and Telecommunications lost 234 (1.8 percent).

Financial Activities

Financial Activities employment was off slightly in June, losing 600 jobs (0.3 percent). Finance and Insurance added 500 jobs (0.3 percent), but all of that and more was given back by Real Estate and Rental and Leasing, which lost 1,100 (3.1 percent). On the year the supersector lost 386 jobs (0.2 percent). It was one of only three supersectors with negative over-the-year job growth. Finance and Insurance employment was mostly flat, but Real Estate and Rental and Leasing lost 400 jobs (1.1 percent).

Professional and Business Services

Employment in Professional and Business Services was up by 900 (0.2 percent) in June. Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services drove the growth once again, adding 1,700 jobs (1.1 percent). It was the third consecutive month wherein the supersector added more than 1,000 jobs. Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services lost 800 (0.6 percent) on the month, while Management of Companies was flat. Annually the supersector added 5,434 jobs (1.4 percent). All three published component sectors added jobs. Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services added 3,112 (2 percent), Management of Companies and Enterprises added 382 (0.5 percent), and Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services added 1,940 (1.4 percent).

Educational and Health Services

Employment in Educational and Health Services was off by 600 (0.1 percent) in June. Health Care and Social Assistance lost 1,300 jobs (0.3 percent) while Educational Services added 700 (1.1 percent). The supersector has lost jobs in every month since the start of 2018. Over the year employment in Educational and Health Services was up by 5,143 (1 percent). Educational Services added 2,702 jobs (4.4 percent), and Health Care and Social Assistance added 2,441 (0.5 percent).

Leisure and Hospitality

Leisure and Hospitality employment was up by 2,700 (1 percent) in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. Accommodation and Food Services added 2,500 jobs (1.1 percent) while Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation added 200 (0.4 percent). Annually the supersector added 13,728 jobs (4.8 percent). This is a noteworthy over-the-year increase, as May’s employment was only 1.8 percent higher than in 2017. The supersector had been showing negative or slowing over-the-year growth since late 2017, so it’s possible that June’s increase marked a rebound. Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation added 3,900 jobs (7.6 percent), and Accommodation and Food Services added 9,828 (4.2 percent).

Other Services

The Other Services supersector added 200 jobs (0.2 percent) in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. It was the third consecutive month of over-the-month gains for the supersector. Annually Other Services employment was down by 1,300 (1.2 percent). All three component sectors lost jobs on the year.

Government

Government employment was down by 1,000 (0.2 percent) in June. State Government drove most of the losses, off by 900 (0.9 percent). Annually Government employers added 4,137 jobs (1 percent). That growth was all at the state and local level, as Federal Government shed 592 jobs (1.8 percent).

Seasonally Adjusted Nonfarm Employment (in thousands)
Industry Jun-18 May-18 Apr-18
Total Nonfarm 2,962.3 2,955.7 2,945.0
Goods-Producing 455.3 451.8 449.4
Mining and Logging 6.5 6.5 6.5
Construction 123.0 121.5 120.8
Manufacturing 325.8 323.8 322.1
Service-Providing 2,507.0 2,503.9 2,495.6
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 542.0 541.4 541.0
Information 50.6 49.7 49.8
Financial Activities 180.3 180.9 180.1
Professional and Business Services 376.8 375.9 373.0
Educational and Health 536.0 536.6 537.5
Leisure and Hospitality 277.1 274.4 269.9
Other Services 117.0 116.8 115.9
Government 427.2 428.2 428.4
Source: Department of Employment and Economic Development, Current Employment Statistics, 2018.




line graph- Minnesota Employment Growth, June 2017 to June 2018


*Over-the-year data are not seasonally adjusted because of small changes in seasonal adjustment factors from year to year. Also, there is no seasonality in over-the-year changes.

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