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Providing information, education, and training to build knowledge, develop skills, and change attitudes that will lead to increased independence, productivity, self determination, integration and inclusion (IPSII) for people with developmental disabilities and their families.

Index of Videos

Topic: Basic Rights Issues

Rud Turnbull: The Convergence of Disability Law and Policy

In 2014, professor Rud Turnbull gave a multi-part review of how personhood, personal relationships and the notion of dignity are at the heart of all disability-related policies, laws, programs and services.

Erthical Issues, End of Life

In 1984, a series of CNN news reports illustrated that ethical and end-of-life issues are fundamentally different for people with developmental disabilities compared to other groups.

Jim Conroy: Quality of Care

In 2011, Jim Conroy, a specialist in quality of life issues, described how measurable quality of life outcomes should guide the services and supports received by individuals with developmental disabilities.

A HIstory of Human Services: Dr. Wolf Wolfensberger

In 1988, Dr. Wolf Wolfensberger described the changes occurring in social justice, compassion, dignity, and empowerment, what still needs to be done, and what needs to be done differently.

Independence to Inclusion

With persistent stigma and stereotypes, how will inclusion in schools, the workplace, and the community affect the lives of thousands of Minnesotans with developmental disabilities?

Bengt Nirje on Normalization

In 1993, professor Bengt Nirje presented his principle of normalization: people with disabilities should have access to normal routines and rhythms of life; and their choices, wishes, and desires are respected.

Bill of Rights

Medical Care Rights
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know about your medical care. You can choose who goes with you to an appointment. Information must be provided when you ask.

The Right to Services for the Facility          
You are not an employee of where you live. If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right not to work in your facility. Cleaning, taking out trash, or other labors are staff responsibilities.

The Right to Your Treatment Plan
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to participate in your planning meeting, and the right to have someone you choose participate with you, or attend instead of you.

The Right to Information About Your Rights
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know information about your rights. Staff must tell you about your rights. What to do if you're not getting the information.

The Right to Courteous Treatment
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, it is not okay for the staff at your home to treat you disrespectfully or to not be courteous. You have a right to courtesy and respectful treatment.

The Right to Communication Privacy
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to communicate privately by telephone, mail or in person. What to do if someone opens your mail or you can't come and go as you choose.

The Right to Other Services
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know about the services available to you, what they cost, and what services cost extra. Staff must explain costs to you so you understand.

Other Rights
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to your own money, the right to meet with your own family and friends, and to participate in social, religious, and political activities.

Privacy Rights (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to privacy. Staff, visitors and residents must respect your privacy and information about you, and your religion, friends and culture.

The Right to Appropriate Healthcare 
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to appropriate medical and personal care based on your needs. Staff ignoring your request for medical care is a violation of your right.

The Right to Courteous Treatment (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, it is not okay for the staff at your home to treat you disrespectfully or to not be courteous. You have a right to courtesy and respectful treatment.

The Right to Other Services (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know about the services available to you, what they cost, and what services cost extra. Staff must explain costs to you so you understand.

Other Rights (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to your own money, the right to meet with your own family and friends, and to participate in social, religious, and political activities.

Medical Care Rights (with audio description)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know about your medical care. You can choose who goes with you to an appointment. Information must be provided when you ask.

The Right to Services for the Facility (with audio descriptions)          
You are not an employee of where you live. If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right not to work in your facility. Cleaning, taking out trash, or other labors are staff responsibilities.

The Right to Your Treatment Plan (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to participate in your planning meeting, and the right to have someone you choose participate with you, or attend instead of you.

The Right to Communication Privacy (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to communicate privately by telephone, mail or in person. What to do if someone opens your mail or you can't come and go as you choose.

The Right to Appropriate Healthcare (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to appropriate medical and personal care based on your needs. Staff ignoring your request for medical care is a violation of your right.

The Right to Information About Your Rights (with audio descriptions)
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to know information about your rights. Staff must tell you about your rights. What to do if you're not getting the information.

Privacy Rights
If you live in a group home or supervised residence, you have the right to privacy. Staff, visitors and residents must respect your privacy and information about you, and your religion, friends and culture.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Refuse Care (with audio description)
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to refuse medical care, medications, and dietary restrictions; here's what can happen if refusal is made.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Personal Property (with audio description)
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to own, keep, use, and lock up their personal property where they reside; here's what can happen if refusal is made.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Complaints (with audio description)
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to file complaints about unfair treatment or being ignored, and the right to be heard.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Freedom from Maltreatment (with audio description)
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to live without abuse, maltreatment, or neglect; here's what to do if it happens to you.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Refuse Care
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to refuse medical care, medications, and dietary restrictions; here's what can happen if refusal is made.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Personal Property
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to own, keep, use, and lock up their personal property where they reside; here's what can happen if refusal is made.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Complaints
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to file complaints about unfair treatment or being ignored, and the right to be heard.

Bill of Rights: The Right to Freedom from Maltreatment
People living in group homes and residences that are supervised have the right to live without abuse, maltreatment, or neglect; here's what to do if it happens to you. View here.

With an Eye to the Future

Xochil Flores on Medicaid
In 2018, Xochil Flores said her seven-year-old daughter wasn't expected to survive when she was born. With Medicaid's help, her daughter's learned to walk and speak Spanish, English, and use sign language.

Sherri Melander Smith on Medicaid
In 2018, Sherri Melander Smith said the home making, meal delivery and care services provided through Medicaid after her injury aided in her healing and her return as a contributing member of society.

Sally Anderl on Medicaid
In 2018, Sally Anderl described how Medicaid helped her son with hearing aids, transportation, and breathing treatments for his asthma. Now he's a college graduate and has been an IBM engineer for 18 years.

Ricardo Mourao on Medicaid
Medicaid helped Ricardo Mourao with his medical needs after a five-month-long coma. In 2018, he shared how he learned his determination was the biggest influence on his life.

Reid Scheller on Medicaid
In 2018, Reid Scheller described how he's able to get personal assistance with Medicaid, and it's a source of good health insurance as he learns to live in a place of his own.

Paul Korpela on Medicaid
In 2018, Paul Korpela told of how the therapy services his son Trent's been able to receive with Medicaid have improved the entire family's quality of life.

Nathan Colomina on Medicaid
In 2018, Nathan Colomina said he has more opportunities in his life with Medicaid, such as housing options and greater flexibility with his transportation for medical needs.

Lyndsey Reece on Medicaid
Lyndsey Reece's four-year-old daughter was born a "micro-preemie" and has needed daily medications and injections all her life. In 2018, she said Medicaid has allowed their family to avoid devastating debt.

Lea Sue Sandberg on Medicaid
In 2018, Lea Sue Sandberg said Medicaid had improved the building blocks of her everyday existence: medications, hearing aids, mental health services, and transportation to get to and from her job.

Kelly Korpela on Medicaid
In 2018, Kelly Korpela described how Medicaid services helped not only her son with autism, but helped her and her husband learn the ropes of helping their entire family.

Kelly Kausel on Medicaid
In 2018, Kelly Kausel said Medicaid's been life-changing for her son to get the medically-necessary therapies that that he's needed, so he'll be as independent as possible in adulthood.

Katie Swenson on Medicaid
In 2018, Katie Swenson said the health insurance that she and her husband have through their jobs doesn't provide what their son needs. Medicaid is a lifeline for their family.

Judy Weiser on Medicaid
In 2018, Judy Weiser said that with Medicaid, she's healthier and has a safe place to live.

Jason Blomquist on Medicaid
In 2018, Jason Blomquist said Medicaid is an example of what we can accomplish with diligence and persistence. "I work, pay taxes, and have never had to live in a facility."

Jaclyn Landon on Medicaid
In 2018, Jaclyn Landon said that it's easy for a family's financial burden to get out of control very quickly. "For a lot of families, the necessary services are just not possible without Medicaid."

Elizabeth Peterson on Medicaid
In 2018, Elizabeth Peterson said Medicaid has enabled her to improve her life, by providing the medicines and care that she wouldn't have been able to get otherwise.

Bonnie Jean Smith on Medicaid
In 2018, Bonnie Jean Smith described how her son has been able to do positive things for himself and make choices through Medicaid.

Annie Newville on Medicaid
In 2018, Annie Newville said that Medicaid provided the behavioral therapy her son needed when their private insurance would not cover it. He's in general ed classrooms now because of the help from Medicaid.

Disability Justice

ADA to Today
In 2012, Judge Donovan Frank describes how, before passage of the ADA, discrimination on the basis of disability was widespread.

Constitutional Laws and Voting Rights
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz described how outdated viewpoints restrict the voting rights of people with disabilities.

Complexities of Voting Law
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz described how a state's laws often contradict provisions in state constitutions.

Voting is a Fundamental Liberty Right
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz described voting as a fundamental right and that people with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to having their voting rights infringed.

Voting Rights Minnesota
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz said that Minnesota's voting laws directly conflict with the Minnesota state constitution, a violation of federal due process.

Stereotypes and Voters' Rights
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz explained that stereotypes and misconceptions persist about guardianship and people with disabilities that prevents them from exercising their right to vote.

Changes to the Voting System
In 2012, professor Elizabeth Schiltz discussed how voting restrictions are often based on assumptions that people with disabilities can't make reasoned judgments about what candidates they prefer.

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The GCDD is funded under the provisions of P.L. 106-402. The federal law also provides funding to the Minnesota Disability Law Center,the state Protection and Advocacy System, and to the Institute on Community Integration, the state University Center for Excellence. The Minnesota network of programs works to increase the IPSII of people with developmental disabilities and families into community life.