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School-linked mental health services

School-Linked Mental Health Grants - Map (PDF) 
Overview page (PDF)

State infrastructure grants support school-linked mental health services throughout Minnesota. These school-connected clinical mental health treatments include interventions that:

  • Increase accessibility for children and youth who are uninsured or under insured
  • Improve clinical and functional outcomes for children and youth with a mental health diagnosis
  • Improve identification of mental health issues for children and youth

This initiative connects or co-locates effective mental health services with schools and students at the local level. This project has proven particularly effective in reaching children who have never accessed mental health services. Many children with serious mental health needs were first identified through this program, including 47.5 percent of children who met the criteria for SED (12,289 children total). This increased access was particularly important for students from cultural and ethnic minority communities. Overall, students of color served were significantly more likely to be accessing mental health services for the first time compared to white students (58% to 52%).

Schools (PDF)

Intermediate School Innovation Grants

Starting summer of 2018, five Intermediate School Innovation Grants were awarded with the goal of improving clinical outcomes for students, helping students to return to their home school district, reversing the disproportionate impact on students of color, and providing support and training for school staff and parents.

Intermediate schools are schools that provide highly specialized educational programs to students and families, such as special education, area learning centers, career tech programs and online learning. Minnesota has five intermediate districts that serve more than 20,000 students annually. The two-year grants go to three mental health providers who will work with intermediate schools and to two intermediate school districts who qualify as mental health providers themselves.

Funding for these innovative school projects came from the 2017 legislature, who provided $4.9 million over the next two years.

Grantees (PDF)

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