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DEED Awards $6.28 Million for Contamination Cleanup Projects

Projects will attract $766.2 million in private investments, create or retain 1,935 jobs

7/3/2018 8:43:56 AM

Shane Delaney, 651-259-7236
Shane.M.Delaney@state.mn.us

ST. PAUL – Grants totaling $6.28 million were awarded by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) to clean up 17 polluted sites that have been approved for redevelopment.

DEED awarded the funding under its Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grants Program for projects that will create or retain 1,935 jobs and attract $766.2 million in private investment. Local tax bases will increase by $9.2 million because of the projects.

“Cleaning up contaminated sites is not only good for the environment, it’s good for the economy,” said DEED Commissioner Shawntera Hardy. “These projects will create jobs, attract private investments and generate new tax revenue for Minnesota cities.”

DEED cleanup grants account for about 75 percent of funding used for reclaiming polluted sites and brownfields statewide. The remaining 25 percent comes from the Metropolitan Council, cities, counties, other local units of government, private landowners and developers.

DEED’s Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grant Program has awarded 507 grants worth over $182 million since the program’s inception in 1995. Thanks to the funding, 3,594 acres of contaminated property have been reclaimed for development projects, resulting in 23,089 new jobs and 26,373 retained jobs. The program has attracted $7.2 billion in private investments and generated nearly $128 million in new tax revenue.

The DEED website has more information on the Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grants Program.

The following are details of the latest funding round:

Fridley – Northern Stacks VIII
The Fridley Housing and Redevelopment Authority was awarded $432,000 in cleanup funding for this 11.66-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. The site previously was used for dumping and filling and was most recently occupied by printing and storage businesses. Plans call for renovating and rebranding an existing 180,000-square-foot building for office/warehouse purposes. It is anticipated this project will create 18 jobs, retain 82 jobs and increase the tax base by $185,619. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and tax increment financing.
Local Contact: City of Fridley, Paul Bolin, 763-572-3590

Golden Valley – Global Pointe Senior Community
Golden Valley was approved for $315,819 in cleanup funding for this 0.99-acre site polluted with petroleum and other contaminants. A dry cleaner, farm, restaurant, drugstore and dental clinic have all operated on this site. A five-story, 98-unit senior living apartment complex is planned. The project is expected to create 18 jobs and increase the tax base by $462,549. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of Golden Valley, Eric Eckman, 763-593-8084

Mankato – 507 N. Riverfront Drive
Mankato was awarded $115,217 in cleanup funding for this 0.56-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. This site, formerly used by a dry-cleaning business, will be redeveloped into a three-story, mixed-use building offering 3,500 square feet of commercial space and 13 apartment units. Officials anticipate the project will create nine jobs, retain 43 jobs and increase the tax base by $26,570. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of Mankato, Kristin Prososki, 507-387-8687

Minneapolis – 36 Bryant
The city of Minneapolis will receive $160,651 in cleanup funding for this 0.25-acre site contaminated with mercury and other pollutants. This former site of a rug-cleaning business will be redeveloped into a four-story, 41-unit apartment complex. It is anticipated this project will create four jobs and increase the tax base by $91,684. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – Bassett Creek East
Minneapolis was awarded $278,887 in cleanup funding for this 0.9-acre site contaminated with lead and other pollutants. This site was previously used for scrap iron, towel and rag cleaning, and drum refurbishing. Plans call for building a six-story, mixed-use building offering 3,600 square feet of commercial space and 139 apartment units. The project is expected to create 15 jobs and increase the tax base by $391,759. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – Calhoun Towers
Minneapolis was approved for $77,601 in cleanup funding for this 4.35-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. Unpermitted dumping occurred on the site in the past, and part of the area later was redeveloped into the existing Calhoun Towers apartments. That complex will be expanded with 242 additional housing units and a rebuilt parking ramp. Officials anticipate the project will create five jobs, retain five jobs and increase the tax base by $843,938. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – Sons of Norway
Minneapolis was awarded $741,553 in cleanup funding for this 2.9-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. Housing, a gas station and a dry cleaner have all occupied the site in the past. The property will be redeveloped into 317 residential units, 15,000 square feet of office space for Sons of Norway and 7,000 square feet of retail space. The project is expected to create 35 jobs, retain 50 jobs and increase the tax base by $990,537. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – Superior Plating Phase 2
Minneapolis was approved for $1.2 million in cleanup funding for this 2.28-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. Coal yards, fueling companies, a plating facility and gas station previously occupied this site. The property will be redeveloped into a 12-story building offering 8,163 square feet of commercial space and 333 apartment units. Officials anticipate the project will create 44 jobs and increase the tax base by $1.2 million. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – The Expo
Minneapolis was awarded $664,274 in cleanup funding for this 2.52-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. The former site of an auto repair garage and gas stations will be redeveloped into a six-story building and a 25-story building. The two buildings will be connected and will offer 3,176 square feet of commercial space and 372 apartment units. The project is expected to create 16 jobs and increase the tax base by $1.7 million. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

Minneapolis – Thrivent Corporate Campus
Minneapolis received $755,756 in cleanup funding for this 2.51-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. Housing, an ice cream factory, auto repair and gas station, and printing business were previously located on this site. Plans call for an eight-story office building that will serve as the Thrivent Corporate Campus. Officials anticipate the project will retain almost 1,300 jobs and increase the tax base by more than $2.3 million. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of Minneapolis, Kevin Carroll, 612-673-5181

St. Paul – 769 University/Ain Da Yung
St. Paul was awarded $93,813 in cleanup funding for this 2.51-acre site contaminated with lead and other pollutants. Formerly used for housing and other purposes, this site will be redeveloped into a four-story, 42-unit apartment complex. The project will provide housing and supportive services to homeless Native American youths between the ages of 18 and 24. It is anticipated that this project will create 14 jobs and increase the tax base by $41,524. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of St. Paul, Dan Bayers, 651-266-6685

St. Paul – Legends at Berry
St. Paul was approved for $389,136 in cleanup funding for this 8-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. Formerly used as a lumber yard and sawmill, this site will be redeveloped into two four-story apartment buildings containing 241 units of affordable senior housing. It is anticipated this project will create four jobs and increase the tax base by $264,937. Matching costs will be paid the developer.
Local Contact: City of St. Paul, Jamie Radel, 651-266-6614

St. Paul – Metro Deaf School
St. Paul was approved for $306,800 in cleanup funding for this 5.02-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. The site previously was used for manufacturing lead acid batteries. Developers plan to renovate and repurpose an existing 112,797-square-foot building into a 34 classroom, public charter school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. It is anticipated this project will create five jobs and retain 69 jobs. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.
Local Contact: City of St. Paul, Jamie Radel, 651-266-6614

St. Paul – Snelling and St. Clair Redevelopment
St. Paul was awarded $99,900 in cleanup funding for this 0.70-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. This site, previously used by a dry-cleaning business, will be redeveloped into a 118-unit apartment complex with 4,000 square feet of retail space. Officials anticipate this project will create 16 jobs and increase the tax base by $313,782. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: City of St. Paul, Diane Nordquist, 651-266-6640

St. Paul – Minnesota Chemical
The St. Paul Port Authority was approved for $290,691 in cleanup funding for this 1.45-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. The site previously was used for the distribution of dry-cleaning chemicals and equipment. Redevelopment will consist of renovating existing buildings into 45,000 square feet of office space. The project is expected to create 60 jobs, retain 106 jobs and increase the tax base $172,320. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.
Local Contact: Saint Paul Port Authority, Monte Hilleman, 651-204-6237

Virginia – 118 Chestnut St.
The city of Virginia was awarded $13,590 in cleanup funding for this 0.07-acre site contaminated with petroleum and other pollutants. A grocery store, appliance repair shop, thrift store, automotive supply company and printing company previously operated on this site. The property will be renovated into 1,500 square feet of commercial space. The project is expected to create three jobs and increase the tax base by $714. Matching costs will be paid by the city.
Local Contact: City of Virginia, Britt See-Benes, 218-748-7500

Winona – Main Square Community
The Winona Port Authority received $322,671 in cleanup funding for this 1.9-acre site contaminated with tetracholoroethene, metals and other pollutants. The site, which has been used for various industrial purposes, will be redeveloped into 60 units of rental housing, 20,000 square feet of commercial space and a Montessori school. It is anticipated this project will create 20 jobs and increase the tax base by $191,321. Matching costs will be paid by the Winona Port Authority.
Local Contact: City of Winona, Lucy McMartin, 507-457-8250

DEED is the state’s principal economic development agency, promoting business recruitment, expansion and retention, workforce development, international trade and community development. For more details about the agency and its services, visit theDEED website or follow us on Twitter.

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Upon request, this information can be made available in alternate formats for people with disabilities by contacting the DEED Communications Office at 651-259-7161.

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