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Advanced Practice Nursing Information


The online process to apply for an APRN license is active. Please access Online Services to submit an application online.

Who may practice: An individual licensed as an APRN by the board of nursing and certified by a national nurse certification organization acceptable to the board to practice as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP), Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM), or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The APRN must be certified as one of the four APRN roles and one of the six population foci. CNP and CNS beginning practice after July 1, 2014 must practice for at least 2,080 hours within the context of a collaborative management setting in a hospital or integrated clinical setting where APRNs and physicians work together. Collaborative management means a mutually agreed upon plan for the overall working relationship between a CNP or CNS and one or more Minnesota licensed physician or APRN that designates the scope of collaboration needed to manage the care of patients. The CNP, CNS and one of the collaborating physicians or APRN must have experience in providing care to patients with the same or similar medical problems. APRNs that are licensed and are on the Minnesota APRN registry on or prior to July 1, 2014, will complete an affidavit confirming the completion of the required 2,080 hours.

Practitioner: Practitioner means a licensed doctor of medicine, licensed doctor of osteopathy, licensed doctor of dentistry, licensed doctor of optometry, licensed podiatrist, licensed veterinarian, or a licensed advanced practice registered nurse.

Primary Care Provider: A licensed health care provider who acts as the first point of care for comprehensive health care maintenance and promotion, preventative care, and undiagnosed health care concerns, and who provides continuing care of varied health conditions.

What is the definition of advanced practice registered nursing: The practice of advanced practice registered nursing means the performance of an expanded scope of nursing in at least one of the recognized advanced practice roles and for at least one population focus. An individual licensed as an APRN by the board of nursing and certified by a national nurse certification organization acceptable to the board to practice as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP), Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM), or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The APRN must be certified as one of the four APRN roles and one of the six population foci. APRNs are accountable to patients for the quality of APRN care rendered, recognizing the limits of knowledge and experience, planning for the management for situations beyond the APRNs expertise. APRNs accept referrals, consult with, supervise, and interpret diagnostic studies, excluding interpreting computed tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging scans, positron emission tomography scans, nuclear scans, and mammography.

Does the Nurse Practice Act define the scopes of practice for clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, nurse mid-wives, and nurse practitioners?: The practice of advanced practice registered nursing means the performance of an expanded scope of nursing in at least one of the recognized advanced practice roles and for at least one population focus. The scope and standards of an APRN are defined by the national professional nursing organizations specific to the practice as a CNS,CNM,CNP, or CRNA in the specific population focus. The scope includes but is not limited to performing acts of advanced assessment, diagnosing, prescribing, and ordering. The practice includes function as a primary care provider, direct care provider, case manager, consultant, educators and researcher.

Are APRNs authorized to prescribe? Licensed APRNs are authorized to prescribe, dispense and administer drugs, controlled substances (Schedule II through V) and therapeutic devices.

How does an advanced practice registered nurse identify authority to practice?:

  • Jane Doe APRN, CNS
  • Jane Doe APRN, CNP
  • Jane Doe APRN, CNM
  • Jane Doe APRN,CRNA
  • Educational degrees may be added.

Is a collaborative management plan required?: CNM and CRNA are not required to have a collaborative management agreement nor a written prescribing agreement (except for a CRNA who will provide nonsurgical therapies for acute or chronic pain - see below). CNPs and CNSs beginning practice after July 1, 2014, must practice for at least 2,080 hours within the context of a collaborative management setting in a hospital or integrated clinical setting where APRNs and physicians work together. A written prescribing agreement is not required.

What national nurse certification organizations are acceptable to the Board?: Based upon criteria established by the Board, the following national nurse certification organizations have been determined to be acceptable as certifying organizations:

CRNA practice of nonsurgical therapies for acute and chronic pain:
Acute and chronic pain: A CRNA may perform nonsurgical therapies for acute and chronic pain symptoms upon referral and in collaboration with a Minnesota licensed physician. The CRNA and the one or more physicians must have a mutually agreed upon plan that designates the scope of collaboration needed for providing nonsurgical therapies to patients with acute and chronic pain. The CRNAmust perform the nonsurgical therapies at the same licensed health care facility as the physician.
Chronic pain: A CRNA must have a written prescribing agreement with a Minnesota licensed physician that defines the delegated responsibilities related to prescribing drugs and therapeutic devices within the scope of the agreement and the practice of the CRNA.

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