2013 Odyssey Sessions

Conference attendees will have over 125 different sessions—pre-conference intensives, workshops, open forums, roundtables, and more—to choose from over the two days of the Odyssey conference. Provided on this page are links to the full session detail (that is, description, presenters, room assignment, etc.) for all.

A draft of the 81-page Session Description document (PDF) is available to download and print. 

Pre-conference IntensivesRoundtable SessionsSchedule

Concurrent Sessions & Special Features in Exhibit Hall

A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : L : M : N : O : P : R : S : T : U : V : W

1981-2013 The Aging HIV Epidemic: New Strategies for a Changing Demographic

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 to 2 p.m.

Room O, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: By 2015, more than half of all people living with HIV in the U.S. will be over the age of 50. This session will provide an overview of who is affected by the HIV epidemic in Minnesota with a breakdown by gender, age, race and geographic distribution. Receive an overview of HIV disease, how it intersects with the aging process, and how to tailor prevention messages to older adults. A discussion on the National HIV Strategy will cover the Affordable Care Act and its impact on HIV positive individuals. It will also include local resources for providers, including Minnesota’s HIV/AIDS drug assistance program.

Participants will:

  • Receive an overview of local and national HIV epidemiology
  • Understand HIV transmission, prevention methods, and testing procedures and learn strategies to communicate these messages to older adults
  • Be able to identify unique ways aging affects the progression of HIV disease and treatment options
  • Learn of local HIV resources and the steps to enroll into Minnesota’s HIV/AIDS drug assistance program.


Presenters: Becca Stickney, community education coordinator, Bonnie Rossow, community educator, both from Minnesota AIDS project; Katheryn Olson, supervisor, DHS, Disabilties Services Division


The 2013 Minnesota Legislative Session: Implications and Changes

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 to 4 p.m.

Room L, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Presenters will provide an overview of the 2013 legislative session and implications for the state’s programs and services for persons with disabilities and older persons in Minnesota. The audience will receive basic information regarding legislative action and policy changes.

Presenters: Laura Sayles, moderator, Loren Colman, assistant commissioner, both from DHS, Continuing Care Administration; Alex Bartolic, director, DHS, Disability Services Division; Jean Wood, director, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division, & executive director, Minnesota Board on Aging; Bob Held, director, DHS, Nursing Facility Rates and Policy Division; David Rosenthal, director, DHS, Division of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services


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Accessibility: It’s Easy in Microsoft© Word 2010.

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 to 4 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 3, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic knowledge of Microsoft(c) Word software.

Description: This presentation will demonstrate how to make documents in Microsoft© Word 2010 accessible to persons with disabilities. This course has been presented numerous times as part of an accessibility training curriculum at Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS). Participants will receive a set of Tip Cards designed by members of the DHS Accessibility Training Design Team.
Participants will:

  • Create an accessible document using universal design principles
  • Incorporating the best use of styles, lists, fonts, colors, hyperlinks, alternative text and other features to make a document accessible
  • Locate accessibility information on the Tip Cards when creating a document


Presenters: Constance Morton, coordinator, DHS, Agencywide Development and Learning


Accessing Written Materials Regardless

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 to 4 p.m.

Ballroom 304, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: People who are blind, visually impaired or unable to read print because of another disability need alternative ways to access written materials. By providing this access, the State Services for the Blind ensures that literacy and inclusiveness are reachable for all Minnesotans regardless of disability. This session will explore the wide variety of products that are available through a specialized unit at State Services for the Blind called the Communication Center. These products include braille, audio transcription, e-text, a radio reading services, audio books (utilizing a special player provide at no cost), audio books transferred to users by e-file or audio books downloaded directly from a web application. Additionally, participants will explore the varieties of technology people who are print impaired use to facilitate access. Following this session participants will know what one needs to meet eligibility standards and how they can enroll. Specific attention will be paid to eligibility for people with learning disabilities, which requires a signature from a medical doctor.

Presenters: Linda Woodstrom, alternative media coordinator, Minnesota State Services for the Blind; Dan Gausman, librarian, Minnesota State Services for the Blind; Ed Lecher, agency representative, Minnesota State Services for the Blind


Advanced Care Planning: Successful Models for Improved Quality of Life

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 to 4 p.m.

French River 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of advance directives.

Description: Having choices about health care has never been more important. Faced with a life threatening, limiting, or chronic illness, patients and their families are thrust into a myriad of treatment options. Patients and families want information to understand the decision making process that encompasses both physical and emotional aspects of health care. Facilitated advanced care planning (ACP) can provide opportunities for patients and families to make informed, carefully considered treatment decisions that can be communicated to health care professionals. As part of a comprehensive ACP program, learn about the Provider Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) paradigm that facilitates communication of patient decisions to local health care settings, strategies of several collaborative partners, and the programs they have implemented to provide ACP services to improve the patient’s quality of life.

Participants will:

  • Be able to explain the benefits of Advance Care planning (ACP) for adults with chronic or life-limiting illnesses and describe the advantages of the POLST paradigm
  • Incorporate Advanced Illness Planning (AIP) into generalized and illness-directed patient visits and explain how this improves quality of life
  • Identify several models involving health plans, collaborative partners, and health care professionals and the role these models play in influencing systemic change in patient care.


Presenters: Craig Christianson, MD, associate medical director, UCare; Nancy Hall, MS, RN, assistant professor of nursing, Bemidji State University; Mark Papke-Larson, chaplain, Sanford Health of Northern Minnesota


An Innovative Care Management Model for People with Disabilities

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 to 2 p.m.

French River 1, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: In anticipation that additional individuals with disabilities (Special Needs Basic Care or SNBC populations) will join our health plan, UCare developed an innovative care management model focusing on improving the health of our members. This model was designed to provide support and assistance to individuals navigating complex health systems. It is based on a well accepted risk analysis and case management identification tool from Johns Hopkins. Members are stratified and assigned a risk score based on diagnosis, utilization of services, cost, and self-reported health risk assessment (HRA) responses. UCare's model offers five care management options based on risk score and health needs. These options range from surveillance to intensive community-based ongoing care coordination. Learn how the role of the UCare new care model improves access and care coordination for SNBC members.

Participants will:

  • Learn about UCare’s experience in designing a care model for people with disabilities using information gathered from aging care models
  • Understand how a stratification process can be utilized to manage rapid enrollment of a large group of individuals with disabilities
  • Discuss the role of community partners in UCare’s new care model and how it relates to improved health outcomes for SNBC members.


Presenters: Jeri Peters, chief nursing officer, Mike Lynch, associate medical director, both from UCare


Assistive Technology: Strategies for Independence

Monday, June 17, 2 to 3:15 p.m.

Ballroom 301 and 302, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) An understanding of how the use of items/services can make life easier and safer for their clients, themselves and their families.

Description: Aging in Place and living independently are definitely goals that resonate for all of us. This session addresses low tech to high tech interventions and solutions to help make that a reality. Assistive Technology (AT) includes any device or service that helps people maintain or improve their independence in performing their daily living skills; exciting developments in technology facilitate this goal. AT services include assessment and training. This presentation will cover component items that are considered assistive technology as well as integrated devices and systems that work together for the health and wellness of older adults and people with disabilities. Demonstration items will be available, which include tele-wellness systems with clinical and ADL-tracking technology that benefit both the consumer as well as the caregiver. Additionally, home modifications via AT will be presented by a CAPS-certified professional. Reimbursement requirements and funding resources will also be addressed. Information on a state-wide lending and demonstration network will be included.

Presenters: Kathleen Trueman, OTR, SPOT Rehabilitation and Home Health Care; Thomas Ardolf; Carisa Rasmussen, AT team, all from Assistive Technology Network of Mid Minnesota


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Beyond the Pill Box: Creative Approaches to Medication Management

Monday, June 17, 2 to 3:15 p.m.

Room M & N, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Experience with home and community based services and/or program development may be helpful, but not necessary, for session participants.

Description: A collaborative panel of experts will provide valuable insights into the best practices for medication management. We know that up to 50 percent of clients have difficulty taking their medications as directed. Improved medication adherence results in improved health care outcomes and is an essential factor in successful treatment of health conditions. Gain a broader understanding of the importance of medication management and its impact on a chronically ill person’s ability to manage their own self-care. This panel of experts will share lessons learned during their medication management journey.

Participants will:

  • Learn creative approaches and tools for effective medication management and how these tools affect the ability of older adults and persons with disabilities to manage their self-care
  • Learn how medication non-adherence affects patient health and adds to healthcare costs
  • Learn about community pharmacy services to improve medication compliance and resolve medication-related issues, allowing patients to continue living independently
  • Learn to replicate these services in their communities, and acquire resources to develop and implement sustainable models of medication management.


Presenters: Darla Waldner, executive director, Land of the Dancing Sky Area Agency on Aging; Steve Guttormson, marketing director, PioneerCare; Justin Heiser, pharmacist, Thrifty White; Sara McCumber, assistant professor, The College of St. Scholastica


Brain Injury in Minnesota Correctional Facilities: Changing the System

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 to 2 p.m.

St. Louis River Room, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Come and learn about systems changes being made within Minnesota’s Department of Corrections (DOC) facilities to improve chemical dependency treatment (CDT) success rates and to strengthen return to community processes designed to improve outcomes for ex-offenders living with the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Past TBI screening of offenders in the DOC found that 82 percent of the adult male population had a history of brain injury – often causing long-term, adverse impacts. Work is underway to Identify offenders with TBI who require specialized CDT and specialized community resources upon discharge. This work is being funded through federal TBI Program Grant H21MC17234.

Participants will:

  • Acquire information and knowledge re: incidence of traumatic brain injury within national and state correctional facilities
  • Be able to identify possible symptoms of TBI
  • Understand potential roadblocks of, and be able to implement alternative methods for, chemical dependency treatment for individuals with a TBI
  • Be able to use session information to improve identification of and long-term outcomes for clients and community members living with the effects of brain injury.


Presenters: Mary Enge, regional resource specialist, DHS, Disability Services Division; Charlotte Johnson, psychologist, Minnesota Department of Corrections


Building the Foundation for Positive Support Strategies

Monday, June 17, 4 to 5:15 p.m.


Ballroom 304
, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Rule 40 (Minnesota R. 9525.2700-9525.2810) and programmatic use of aversive and deprivation procedures is on the way out the door as the field and statutory standards shift to positive support strategies. A new initiative from the University of Minnesota makes valuable training in person-centered positive behavior support available free of charge to organizations so they can successfully meet the new requirements.

Participants will:

  • Be aware of the shift to new competency-based standards and support culture
  • Know what is available through the Minnesota Positive Behavior Support Initiative, including the 15-month staff training course and 6-week interdisciplinary team building
  • Be able to describe the distinctions between competency-based staff training and knowledge- or awareness-level training


Presenters: Dean Ritzman, policy administrator, DHS, Disabilities Service Division; Tim Moore, research associate, University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration


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Care Coordination: An Approach for High Risk Patients

Tuesday, June 18, 8 to 9:15 a.m.

Horizon Room 203, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: A disjointed health care system has been a major factor in decreased health and high rates of emergency department utilization and hospitalizations among people with disabilities and the frail elderly. Courage Center and Bluestone Solutions are leading the move from the traditional fee-for-service model to a comprehensive and coordinated primary care model, such as a health care home. These innovative programs have been shown to reduce hospitalizations and readmissions and increase health care savings. We will present effective strategies to achieve these gains in health, and we will also discuss the need for payment reform to sustain and encourage widespread appropriate adoption of this health care model.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the health care needs of individuals with disabilities and the frail elderly and strategies to develop models of care delivery to meet those needs
  • Understand the importance of payment reform to sustain and encourage widespread appropriate adoption of the health care home model
  • Be able to describe provider engagement and three techniques to achieving engagement
  • Define "relevant response" and "life geography" and the impact on care coordination.


Presenters: Nancy Flinn, director, Courage Center, Outcoms and Research; Sarah Keenan, VP of innovation, Dr. Dave Moen, president, both from Bluestone Physician Services


Care Transitions: What Can the Senior LinkAge Line Do for My Clients?

Monday, June 17, 2 to 3:15 p.m.

Ballroom 304, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) A basic understanding of the current PASRR process.

Description: The Senior LinkAge Line can help your clients with transitions from the community to nursing home, nursing home to community and everywhere in between. Learn about First Contact, a new initiative where Senior LinkAge Line will be conducting pre-admission screening and resident review (PASRR), as well as connecting consumers to MnCHOICES/Long Term Care Consultation assessments. Get updates on current care transition services by the Senior LinkAge Line including a service that helps people return to the community. Know how the Senior LinkAge Line can help you and your clients in the continuum of care.

Participants will:

  • Describe how First Contact will affect lead agencies, hospitals, nursing homes and consumers
  • Understand the correct protocol to make a referral to the Senior LinkAge Line for help in returning home after being in a nursing home
  • Differentiate between what the people you serve can receive from this service in comparison to other options available


Presenters:
Stephanie Minor, program consultant, Minnesota Board on Aging, Senior LinkAge Line; Darci Buttke, coordinator, Kate Glueckert, coordinator, both from Minnesota Board on Aging, Return to Community; Lori Vrolson, executive director, Central Minnesota Council on Aging


Caregiver Service Providers: Working Together to Support Family Caregivers

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 to 2 p.m.

Room L, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) A general understanding of coalitions

Description: This presentation will describe the work of two collaborations of service providers (one urban, one rural) working together to better support family caregivers. Attendees will learn why the collaborations were formed, their visions, goals and progress toward goals. Presenters will share their perspectives on how you can bring together caregiver service providers in your community.

Participants will:

  • Learn the steps to forming a collaboration of caregiver service providers
  • Learn how the Metropolitan Caregiver Services Collaborative (urban) and Caregiver Professional Networking Group (rural) share knowledge, promote caregiver services, and strengthen public policies for family caregivers
  • Gain an understanding of the information and resources available to support caregiver collaboratives.


Presenters: Emily Farah-Miller, program developer, Leanna Smith, grants and contract manager, both from Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging; Kathy Gilbride, EDP coordinator Central Minnesota Council on Aging


A Collaborative Approach to Transition Management

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

 

(BASIC)

Description: Minnesota’s managed care organizations use the collaboration process for ongoing improvement of care transitions post-hospitalization while streamlining processes for counties, care systems, and agencies. New in 2013, literature based interventions will be introduced to assess members after a hospital discharge with the goal of reducing re-hospitalization for MSHO, MSC+, and SNBC members. Presenters will discuss thee new interventions and explore the value of managing transitions post-discharge by assessing the member’s understanding and ability to:1) Schedule and attend a post-hospitalization appointment.; 2) Manage current medications; 3) Describe the signs and symptoms that should cause a call to the primary care physician; 4) Keep a personal health record.

Participants will:

  • Characterize care transitions and understand its impact on older and disabled adults
  • Review care transition process and documentation requirements for Minnesota Health Plans: MSHO and SNBC
  • Understand the value of assessing the member’s understanding and ability to improve their post-hospitalization care and prevent unplanned readmissions.


Presenters: Lorraine Cummings, quality improvement specialist, UCare; Sally Irrgang, manager regulatory compliance, Medica


College of Direct Supports: Training Direct Support Professionals Online

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.


Ballroom 303, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Investing in education for direct support workers is an important step towards reducing vacancies and turnover. Direct Support Professionals and Frontline supervisors are expected to provide high quality support to individuals with a wide variety of disabilities on a daily basis in all kinds of settings. When workers are trained and know their job well, they are more likely to stay on the job longer. "DirectCourse: College of Direct Support (CDS)" can help provide excellent training needed by today’s direct support workers. DHS is using CDS as a training tool and you could too! Come learn how to develop a tailored training plan and see what courses are available through the college.

Participants will:

  • Introduce DirectCourse suite of curricula as a cost effective tool for training the workforce
  • Demonstrate how easy it is to customize training to meet specific consumer and provider needs and to meet licensing training requirements
  • Demonstrate learning management system available with DirectCourse curricula
  • Introduce the “how to’s” of creating a custom training plan based on the needs of individuals being supported.


Presenters: Nancy McCulloh, project coordinator, University of Minnesota, Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement; Taylor Kearns, training, technical assistance, and communications supervisor, DHS, Disability Services Division


Comfort and Safety: Mom and Dad Living at Home!

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.


St. Louis River Room
, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) A basic understanding of the challenges of successful independent living for older adults and persons with disabilities.

Description: The Mahube-Otwa Homemaking and Chore program promotes safe, independent and healthy home environments for seniors and individuals with disabilities. Learn to apply, enroll, and market for a wide range of waivered and private-pay services to help mom and dad continue to live in their home in their own community. Topics include contracts with vendors and counties, billing, sliding fee scale, client assessments, service provision, project evaluation and program results. See how a project in greater Minnesota is meeting the needs of residents by providing peace of mind to clients and family members.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to design, manage, market, and operate a homemaking and chore program in Minnesota for seniors and individuals with disabilities.
  • Receive examples of documents needed to apply, enroll, provide services, complete billings, manage a sliding fee scale, and measure program results for both waivered and private-pay homemaking and chore clients
  • Have the opportunity to discuss strengths and weaknesses, successes and failures, and potential strategies in similar programs
  • Consider and discuss strategies for approaching and maintaining cost sharing and sustainability.


Presenters: Karen Lenius, senior programs director, Lois Greenig, aging assistance coordinator, both from Mahube-Otwa Community Action Partnership, Inc.


Community First Services and Supports: The Next Step in Self-Direction

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Room M & N, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Familiarity with the current PCA program will be helpful, but is not required.

Description: Community First Services and Supports (CFSS) is a new home and community-based service currently being designed by the Minnesota Department of Human Services--with broad stakeholder input--that will replace Personal Care Assistant (PCA) services. Come learn about CFSS: what it is, what services will be covered, the rationale for this change, the anticipated benefits, as well as the expectations of "support workers" in the context of the implementation of the MnCHOICES assessment.

Participants will:

  • Understand the major differences between PCA and CFSS and the implications for the roles of PCAs, PCA provider organizations, counties, tribes, and managed care organizations.
  • Be able to articulate to current PCA recipients and their families or guardians what changes they can expect to see under CFSS.


Presenters: Jeanine Wilson, supervisor, Home Care and Case Management policy, DHS, Disability Services Division


Connecting Through Technology

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 202, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: The ability to connect with others is critical for quality of life, maintaining independence and self-managing one's health. For people with a combined hearing and vision loss, connecting with others can be challenging. Come and learn about a new program that provides free equipment to people who are deafblind for accessing advanced communications and telecommunications.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the iCanConnect-MN program. Find out who is eligible for the program, what kinds of equipment can be provided, how customized equipment packages are developed for each participant and how to apply.
  • Discover why hearing and vision loss affects different people in different ways and how technology can open avenues of communication.


Presenters: Lee Clark, deafblind specialist, Jan Radatz, policy and planning specialist, both from DHS, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services


Connecting To The Next Step In Falls Prevention

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m

Room O, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side
(INTERMEDIATE) Some understanding of implementation of evidence-based community programs and an interest in making programs accessible to all.

Description: Preventing falls in older adults is a multifaceted effort of formal, informal, clinical, and community-based programs. This workshop will use the continuum model for falls prevention to show the interconnectivity in a “community” surrounding the older adult. The workshop will identify opportunities for organizations to integrate programs across their communities and how to break down the silos to connect older adults with the next program/stage to prevent falls.

Participants will:

  • Receive the most updated Minnesota and national data and learn about the implications of new research findings on formal and informal interventions
  • Be exposed to new tools from CDC for clinical and community assessment of falls risk (STEADI, Otago), and learn about programs that link clinical care and community resources (Otago)
  • Learn more about community programs that address falls risk factors, including fear of falling, home safety, strength and balance (A Matter of Balance, Tai Chi, Moving for Better Balance, Arthritis Foundation Exercise, and Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi)
  • Learn how to adapt community programs so they are accessible for all populations, including people who are deaf or who have low vision, and for racial and ethnic minorities.


Presenters: Kristine Gjerde, falls prevention specialist, Pamela Van Zyl York, project director, both from Minnesota Department of Health; Debra Laine, special projects coordinator, Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging; David Fink, program developer, Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging


Creating an Effective Board of Directors Actively Engaged in Fundraising

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Ballroom 303, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of a non-profit orgainization board helpful but not required.

Description: To meet its mission, a nonprofit organization needs an effective board of directors and a clear understanding of board and staff roles. A nonprofit board is fiscally, legally, and morally responsible for the organization. This interactive workshop explores and clarifies the role of the board with an emphasis on fundraising. The workshop explores why board members are often hesitant to be involved in fundraising, through an understanding of the "human element" of money and asking for money. The workshop then presents strategies to truly engage the board in development. The session will focus on people, innovation, and accountability. Many older adults are board members; this workshop empowers them and their organizations to obtain the resources needed to maintain and grow programs and services.

Participants will:

  • Understand the purpose, fiscal, legal and moral responsibilities of a nonprofit board of directors
  • Understand (and clarify) board roles and functions with an emphasis on fundraising
  • Become sensitive to the hesitancy of board members to become involved in development through an exploration of the "human element" of money and asking for money
  • Be able to identify and apply strategies to effectively engage board members in fundraising.


Presenters: Gary Kelsey, EdD, professor and consultant, Walden University and Gary Kelsey and Associates


Core Competencies: Strengthening the Home and Community Based Workforce

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Horizon Room 202, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some experience relating to direct service workforce development.

Description: The number of Minnesotans over 65 will double by 2035 to 1.4 million. Currently, 41% of rural Minnesotans are over 65. Aging brings a number of high service needs in many sectors. Despite these changes, our workforce remains largely unprepared. In this session, we will discuss key issues facing our workforce, from educating incoming professionals to maintaining our current workforce. We will present a set of core competencies developed with CMS to promote quality service delivery in home and community based settings. The core competency set is a tool that will be applied to develop uniform training policies, common training programs, foundation curricula, and specializations for direct service workers.

Participants will:

  • Describe current demographic trends and workforce challenges related to the aging population
  • Identify the role of competency standards as a foundation for workforce development and quality outcomes in long-term services and supports (LTSS)
  • Explain strategies for applying the core competency standards to promote quality Home and Community Based Services
  • Plan next steps: What can we do to prepare our workforce to better meet individuals’ needs?


Presenters: Pat Schommer, MA, associate director, University of Minnesota, Center on Aging, Minnesota Area Geriatric Education Center; Laurissa Stigen, MS, executive director, Central MN Area Health Education Center (AHEC); Lori Sedlezky, MSW, director of knowledge translation, Annie Johnson Sirek, MSW, project coordinator, both from University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration



Creative Approaches to Increased Independence

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Ballroom 303, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Often older adults and people with disabilities worry that living at home or in the community seems to be a lost option. And yet, many programs are available to assist both older adults and people with disabilities to continue living in the community with supports. This presentation will provide information on a variety of tools available to case managers and providers as they look to develop new and creative services for older adults and people with disabilities. In addition to a lecture presentation, a panel of providers will share success stories about increasing independence for people living in group homes and even more independence as individuals move into, or remain in, their own homes.

Participants will:

  • Learn what tools and resources are available to create new and more independent living situations for older adults and people with disabilities
  • Hear success stories from case managers and providers who have been working on new and creative services
  • Learn how to collaborate with the consumer, family/caregivers, local social services, and community agencies to create a safe plan for independent living.


Presenters: Barb Turner, COO, ARRM; Erin Fontaine, project coordinator, Sheri Cooke, independent living specialist, both from Access North Center for Independent Living


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Dementia Made Easier: Tools for Working with Physicians and Clinics

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 203, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) This session is designed for professionals who are building relationships with individual clinics or entire health care systems to improve practice and build strong community relationships in support of their patients

Description: Fewer than 50% of people with dementia receive a formal diagnosis and when they do it is often delayed by more than 6 years. Significant impairment in function has occurred which results in both premature decline and expensive health care crises. By working with physicians and clinics to adopt the ACT on Alzheimer's Provider Practice Tools people with dementia can be diagnosed earlier when connection to services that promote independent living can be made. This session will discuss challenges to diagnosis in primary care, the importance of early detection, practice tips for social services professionals around working with medical providers specific to increasing referrals for services and supports, as well as engaging in joint care planning.

Participants will:

  • Explain rationale for early detection and diagnosis of dementia
  • Learn easy and efficient screening/diagnostic tools and practice techniques to simplify patient care
  • Explain intervention and referral strategies to maximize patient/family support
  • Discuss the cognitive screening requirement for Medicare Wellness exams and how to establish a complete ‘turn-key’ approach to better serve the needs of the community regarding cognitive issues and dementia.


Presenters: Terry Barclay, MD, clinical director, HealthPartners Neuropsychology


Demonstration of the New MN Nursing Home Report Card

Monday, June 17, 3:15 to 4 p.m.

(BASIC)

Description: The Minnesota Department of Human Services and the Minnesota Department of Health recently released a new Nursing Home Report Card. Odyssey attendees are a key audience for this report card. Stop by to see a demonstration and to offer suggestions for the next release of report card enhancements.

Participants will:

  • Know when the report card will be helpful in their work
  • Know where to find the report card and how to use it
  • Have an opportunity to suggest new features to further improve the report card.

Presenters: Robert Held, division director, DHS, Nursing Facility Rates and Policy Division


Demystifying Sexuality for Individuals with DD/ID

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Ballroom 305, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Previous work with individuals with disabilities and being comfortable discussing sexuality.

Description: Discover how to encourage sexual rights while ensuring responsibility for individuals with disabilities.

Participants will:

  • Learn the stereotypes and barriers to sexual expression that individuals with disabilities encounter.
  • Discuss dating and the Dignity of Risk and how to teach sexual education for individuals with disabilities.
  • Discover how to work with the individual and the individual's team to ensure the person's sexual identity is respected.
  • Learn about the increased risk of sexual abuse that individuals with disabilities face and how to increase protection from sexual exploitation.


Presenters: Leane Brown, program services consultant, STAR Services


Developing Dementia Capable Communities

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Gooseberry Falls 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Elementary knowledge of dementia and its impact on individuals, families and the system of long term services supports.

Description: This presentation will introduce the Dementia Capable Communities Toolkit developed by ACT on Alzheimer's, a statewide collaboration preparing Minnesota for the personal, social, and budgetary impacts of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Presenters will describe how the toolkit can be used to convene and engage a community team, assess a community’s dementia capability, analyze results, and create a plan for achieving greater dementia capability. Community leaders will share their perspectives and lessons learned while testing this innovative toolkit in urban and rural communities.

Participants will:

  • Gain a basic introduction to ACT on Alzheimer's
  • Understand the partnerships needed to create a supportive community environment for people with dementia and their families and friends
  • Review elements of the Dementia Capable Communities Toolkit.
  • Learn how two geographic communities and one faith-based community of affinity have used the toolkit and their results to date.


Presenters: Emily Farah-Miller, project director, ACT on Alzheimer's; Annette Sandler, director of aging and disability services, Jewish Family and Children's Services of Minneapolis; Lori Petersen, marketing director, Bethesda Willmar


Developing Effective Relationships: An Alzheimer's Model

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Horizon Room 203, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) An understanding of the importance of working with physicians and clinics to coordinate care for people with chronic diseases

Description: Earlier diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise. However, few physicians have the time or resources necessary  to provide education and support to newly diagnosed patients. Community organizations that are poised to provide post-diagnostic care still struggle to develop referral relationships with physicians and medical clinics. This session will present techniques for developing effective relationships between social service professionals and physicians. Provider tools and marketing strategies for social services will be described, and a model program connecting patients from physician to community organization will be presented. This model can be replicated and customized to fit the varied needs of nonprofit and social service organizations.

Participants will:

  • Learn strategies and techniques to engage physicians and encourage referrals from the medical clinic to related community organizations
  • Understand the barriers to Alzheimer's diagnosis and referral
  • Discover communication strategies to build partnerships with medical clinics and serve more individuals with early stage Alzheimer’s disease


Presenters: Michelle Barclay, vice president of program services, Alyssa Aguirre, care consultant manager, Maria Clarys, provider outreach, all from Alzheimer's Association Minnesota/North Dakota Chapter


Disability HCBS Waivers 101

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.


Ballroom 304, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Knowledge of Medicaid services available to meet basic needs.

Description: Waiver 101 will provide an overview of the Medicaid Disability Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers authorized in §1915(c) of the Social Security Act. The four disability waivers are the Community Alternative Care (CAC) waiver, the Community Alternatives for Disabled Individuals (CADI) waiver, the Brain Injury (BI) waiver, and the Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver. The waiver program permits a state to furnish an array of home and community-based services that help Medicaid participants live in the community and avoid institutionalization. The waivers seek to provide community-based services in the most integrated and least restrictive setting while supporting participant choice and to promote the optimal health, independence, and safety of a person who meets the waiver eligibility criteria.

Participants will:

  • Understand the eligibility criteria for each disability waiver
  • Understand the level of care criteria for each disability waiver
  • Gain basic knowledge of the services covered under each disability waiver
  • Gain basic knowledge of the disability waivers' Consumer-directed Community Supports (CDCS) service option for individuals on CAC, CADI, or BI waivers.


Presenters: Maria Ockenfels, regional resource specialist, Shannon Smith, regional resource specialist, both from DHS, Disability Services Division


Disability Waivers Rate System: Building a Pricing Architecture

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.


Gooseberry Falls 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic familiarity with DHS’s work in developing a statewide rate setting methodology for disability waiver services

Description: The Department of Human Services (DHS) is creating a web-based rate setting methodology for home and community-based waiver services that builds rates based on costs such as direct staffing, employee-related expenses, program-related expenses, and other factors.  When fully implemented, the Disability Waivers Rate System will provide a transparent and equitable rate-setting process that meets federal requirements for a uniform statewide rate setting methodology for home and community-based services for individuals with disabilities. This session will provide an update on the research phase of the project, implementation timelines, and plans for rate stabilization.

Participants will:

  • Understand the goals of the Disability Waivers Rate System
  • Have a basic understanding of the methodologies
  • Understand the path to implementation


Presenters: Jenny Lewis, agency policy specialist, DHS, Disability Services Division


"Dual Demo" - Improving Integration, Outcomes, Efficiency, and More!

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Gooseberry Falls 2, City Side

(ADVANCED) Background or knowledge relating to managed care, health outcomes, quality metrics, and/or health care delivery systems.

Description: Through the federally-funded Demonstration to Align Administrative Systems for Improvements in Beneficiary Experience (the "Dual Demo"), the integrated programs for dual eligibles in Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO) and Special Needs Basic Care (SNBC) are implementing new payment and delivery reforms. This session will examine and discuss the demonstration’s goals to improve the integration of Medicare and Medicaid through increased participation of integrated provider health care delivery systems, improve enrollee health outcomes as measured through risk-adjusted quality metrics appropriate to the enrolled population, and to align administrative systems to improve efficiency and beneficiary experience.

Participants will:

  • Understand what is meant by "Demonstration to Align Administrative Systems for Improvements in Beneficiary Experience" and the goal of the demonstration
  • Understand what is mean by an Integrated Care System Partnership (ICSP)
  • Understand the many different model options for ICSPs and the various payment types.


Presenters: Pam Parker, manager, DHS, Special Needs Purchasing


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Elderly Waiver and Alternative Care –Supporting Older Adults at Home

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Registration Area, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Minnesota faces the future of increased long-term care costs and a growing number of seniors who are living longer. Nevertheless, Minnesota takes on the challenge of improving outcomes for seniors living in their homes while containing the rising costs of long term care. This session will discuss two programs, the Elderly Waiver (EW) and the Alternative Care (AC) grant and highlight the differences between the programs. There will be information on services, eligibility, cost sharing, and trends. If legislative updates are available, they will be provided.

Participants will:

  • Learn the basics of the two public programs, EW and AC
  • Understand the similarities and differences of EW and AC
  • Learn early intervention strategies to help keep people in their homes longer with these programs
  • Receive any available legislative updates concerning EW and AC.


Presenters: Libby Rossett-Brown, agency policy specialist, Gail Carlson, AC operations, both from DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division


E-Learning: An Innovative Way to Serve Clients

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.


Horizon Room 205
, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Technology is changing and e-learning is changing with it! ZenMation, a leading edge interactive multimedia company, will provide an in-depth workshop on the power of e-learning and how it is transforming the way several state of Minnesota agencies and other nonprofit organizations serve their clients. The session is designed to expand the way you think about e-learning and explore how you can maximize technology to deliver services and educate clients and staff. ZenMation will discuss the basics of e-learning and how to make e-learning fully accessible. You’ll also learn from other organizations that are using e-learning in new, creative ways.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the basic features and benefits of e-learning technology
  • Explore real-life examples of e-learning applications that use web-based and video technologies to serve people with disabilities
  • Discover best practices in how other service providers have creatively implemented e-learning in their organizations
  • Find out how you can design, develop and implement e-learning that is fully accessible and uses the latest technology.


Presenters: Peter Zenner, president, ZenMation, Inc.; Margaret Endres, instructional designer, Endres Communications; John Gournaris, mental health program director, Lee Clark, deafblind specialist, both from DHS, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services; Candace Miller Lopez, development director, Midwest Special Services; Jeff Betchwars, consultant, Executive Management Services


E-Learning: Training When YOU Want It

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

French River 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Electronic or “eLearning" can be a good option for busy counties to present training and program information to individuals who need services, as well as to county employees. eLearning can decrease the amount of time staff spends on training. eLearning is self-paced and can be accessed when the individual has the time. It allows for the communication of consistent, clear information in a graphic and colorful format. This session will demonstrate how Hennepin County is using eLearning tools to provide training to the individuals we serve and employees on such topics as the Consumer Support Grant Program, Data Privacy, and Working With Interpreters.

Participants will:

  • Understand the benefits of providing training electronically over the Internet
  • see and be able to find examples of eLearning tools being used by Hennepin County
  • learn first steps to finding resources and developing their own eLearning


Presenters: Ed Sootsman, supervisor, Jerry Mellum, senior planning analyst, Penny Haney, senior planning analyst, Alexis McCarthy, training specialist, all from Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department


Emergency Preparedness Planning

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Split Rock 1, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Emergencies impact our organizations, clients, and personal lives with greater frequency than ever before. Creating an emergency preparedness plan that takes into consideration issues for all persons (older adults and persons with disabilities) is an important tool. Continuity of operations planning is critical for agencies providing essential services. This workshop will examine best practices in emergency planning and preparedness on several levels, including how to prioritize services and identify resources for continued agency operation in emergences; how all individuals can be more prepared for unexpected emergencies and disasters; and some of the challenges faced by people with Autism Spectrum Disorders in emergencies as well as first responders trying to assist them.

Presenters: Margot Imdieke Cross, accessibility specialist, Minnesota State Council on Disability; Barb Fonkert, individual and functional needs planning coordinator, Department of Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management


Employment First: What Is It?

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 3, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Individuals with disabilities in the labor force have a positive financial impact on our local economy. A strong sentiment exists in Minnesota and across the country that the time is right for public policies and community action that make employment the first option for people with disabilities (a.k.a., Employment First). Minnesota APSE, a network on employment for people with disabilities, has embraced the concept of Employment First, built a coalition of partners, hosted summits and conferences, and created a manifesto that has been the foundation for real policy change in Minnesota. Employment First is about raising expectations. The real engine of social change is not money but expectations. Presenters will share the Minnesota experience and also discuss similar initiatives in several other states.

Participants will:

  • Learn where the Employment First idea originated and how it started in Minnesota
  • Learn how Minnesota APSE has built consensus and moved the Employment First agenda in Minnesota
  • Learn about looking at a whole person and providing an essential array of community supports to ensure integrated employment is a viable option
  • Learn what is next and how people can mobilize in their communities.


Presenters: Steve Piekarski, board chair, Minnesota APSE; Andrea Zuber, manager of disability services, Ramsey County Community Human Services; Bob Niemiec, director, Minnesota Training and Technical Assistance Center


Employment Innovations: You CAN Support Competitive Employment Outcomes

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Split Rock 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) An interest in learning new methods to achieve competitive employment outcomes

Description: A panel of Supported Employment providers discusses 1) how providers and counties work together for competitive employment as the preferred outcome for people with disabilities in Minnesota and 2) the basics of Customized Employment, an approach to employment in which the job-seeker’s interests, preferences, and talents drive the employment development process. These strategies work in urban, suburban, and rural communities when proper adaptations and approaches are utilized. The typical job-seeker customizes their job after being hired and many people with significant disabilities will succeed only if the customization occurs prior to beginning work.

Participants will:

  • Discover how innovative tools like customized employment lead to individualized, competitive employment
  • Learn how providers and counties are meeting the demand to provide individualized, personalized employment service supports that lead to self-determination and integrated community employment.


Presenters: Bob Niemiec, director, Minnesota Training and Technical Assistance Center; Dawn Bacon, planner, Ramsey County; Jolene Thibedau Boyd, director, Community Involvement Programs,  Employment and Community Supports; Angela Burchardt, director, Dependable Home Health Care, Supported Employment Services


Engagement: Active Support Strategies & Selecting the Right Caregivers

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Horizon Room 204, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Experience supporting older people and people with disabilities.

Description: Engagement in meaningful social interactions and everyday activities is an essential need for all people. However, people with disabilities and older people who need daily support have fewer opportunities to be engaged either in their homes or in community environments. We will describe our research findings on engagement levels and factors associated with engagement amongst people with IDD in group homes. We will also describe an intervention called Active Support designed to teach direct support staff methods to increase opportunities for engagement. There are key work styles that drive direct-support staff likelihood for engagement in such interactions. These work styles and their impact on the staff-consumer relationship will be discussed.

Participants will:

  • Understand the level of social and non-social engagement of individuals with IDD living in congregate residential settings based on data from a 5-year longitudinal study on engagement for people with IDD who live in small Minnesota group
  • Understand how actions, attitudes, and work styles of direct-support staff affect the engagement of individuals with IDD they serve
  • Identify one way in which they can change how they support older persons and persons with disabilities with whom they work
  • Know how to select job applicants who possess the key work styles for engagement.


Presenters: Renata Ticha, PhD, Sherri Larson, PhD, Shirley Qian, MA, all from University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration; Timothy Johansson, MA, CP, Casey Lankow, MA, CP, all from Consulting & Research, LLC dba CareProfiler


Evidence Based Health Promotion: What’s the Buzz All About?

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Room M & N, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Come to an interactive information session on evidence-based health promotion programs. This session is a general overview of evidence-based health promotion programming including: Living Well with Chronic Conditions, A Matter of Balance, Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance, Diabetic Self-Management, and Chronic Pain Self-Management. Almost 50 percent of people aged 60 and older have two or more chronic health issues. Take the opportunity to learn how these programs can benefit your clients and your organization. Learn how to become involved in these person-centered approaches through either becoming trained to offer programs, becoming a host site, or through referrals to available programs.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify current evidence-based health promotion programming
  • Be able to identify supporting research and  program benefits for participants and organizations
  • Be able to identify opportunities for involvement through offering workshops, being a host site, or making referrals.


Presenters: Mary Hertel, EBHP coordinator/trainer/contracts and grants manager, Central MN Council on Aging; David Fink, program developer, Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging; Debra Laine, special programs developer, Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging


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Focus on Caregiving: Identification, Engagement and Informal Networks

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.


St. Louis River Room
, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Prior knowledge or experience in current support services for informal caregivers.

Description: Family and friend caregivers form an irreplaceable system of support for older adults. Informal networks of support that surround caregivers are critical to their ability to successfully care for their loved ones and for themselves. Research has shown that only 19% of persons caring for a friend or family member identify themselves as a caregiver, presenting a significant barrier to services. This session will present findings from a survey of caregivers in St. Paul, Caregiving in Context, and take a look at this Wilder Foundation innovative service model to reach caregivers before a crisis. Caregiving in Context provides detailed information on the networks that support caregivers, who is in them, how strong they are, and how they vary among different groups of caregivers. Wilder’s caregiver services model proactively engages caregivers to connect them to education, services, and support.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to implement key strategies to reach, engage, and support caregivers who do not identify as caregivers
  • Be introduced to Caregiver Café, a chronic disease self-management program for caregivers
  • Explore ways to use social media channels to engage and support caregivers
  • Learn how the Wilder Foundation is working to establish collaborative partnerships among healthcare organizations, informal support networks, and community-based service providers.


Presenters: Maureen Kenney, caregiver services program manager, Kristen M. Johnson, community leadership manager, both from Amherst. H. Wilder Foundation


Future Health Programs for People with Disabilities: Utilizing Lessons Learned

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

St. Louis River Room, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Understand basics of managed care

Description: As the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) designs future health programs for people with disabilities, it is important to make use of insights, ideas, and lessons learned from past and current health programs. While DHS moves ahead with health care reform, the agency is examining the Minnesota Disability Health Options (MnDHO) and Special Needs Basic Care – Preferred Integrated Network (SNBC - PIN) services as they provided many innovative ideas for products, services, procedures, and policy.

Participants will:

  • Understand the population that MnDHO and SNBC – PINs Programs serve
  • Learn about the improvements in access, coordination of services, and challenges that need to be addressed while moving forward with reform
  • Understand behavioral health homes and health care delivery system changes as we move forward serving people with disabilities.


Presenters: Deborah Maruska, policy consultant, Tim Ryan, research scientist, both from DHS, Health Care Administration; Richard Seurer, policy consultant, DHS, Chemical and Mental Health Administration


The Future Workforce: Making Work Part of the Plan for Transition Age Youth

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Split Rock 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) An interest in supporting youth in planning for meaningful employment during and after high school.

Description: Youth with disabilities are leaving school with plans for careers and competitive employment. It takes collaboration across all our systems that serve youth in order to ensure effective supports exist. This session will showcase tools, resources, and collaborations to help us prepare students for their futures. Learn more about these tools and strategies from a panel of state agency transition-age youth specialists who will discuss how agencies are working together to help support youth to achieve meaningful post-secondary learning and employment.

Participants will:

  • Develop an understanding of cross-agency initiatives to support youth in their path from school to employment in adulthood
  • Learn to implement the DB101 Youth in Transition Toolkit to support youth in your work.


Presenters: Sara Romagnoli, employment policy lead, DHS, Disability Services Division; Jayne Spain, secondary transition specialist, Sue Benolken, interagency coordination, both from Minnesota Department of Education


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GRH and MSA Housing: How It Can Work For Your Client

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls, City side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some knowledge of supportive housing options and public assistance benefits is helpful but not necessary.

Description: This session will provide an overview of two community living support programs offered through the Minnesota Department of Human Services: Group Residential Housing (GRH) and Minnesota Supplemental Aid (MSA) Housing Assistance. We will discuss the eligibility criteria for the programs and how they can work together to increase housing opportunities for people in your community

Participants will:

  • Understand how the GRH income supplement works, what it pays for, and the different settings GRH can be used in
  • Understand what MSA Housing Assistance is, who is eligible, and how it can be used
  • Understand how GRH and MSA Housing Assistance relate to each other and other benefits and housing supports and how they can be used to increase local community living options
  • Understand the development process for service providers and counties to utilize GRH and MSA Housing Assistance to increase community living options.


Presenters: Beth Grube, Kristine Davis, both community living supports policy consultant, DHS, Transition to Economic Stability


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Healthy Minnesota 2020: A Different Kind of Conversation

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Split Rock 1, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Start a conversation about health and most people will start talking about illness… or about health care. But health is more than the absence of disease and begins long before a visit to the clinic. Physical, social, and spiritual well-being are influenced by many factors, especially our social, economic, and physical environments. The data on these factors reveal that the opportunity to be healthy is not equal for older adults and for people with disabilities. Come learn about Healthy Minnesota 2020 (HM2020), the statewide health improvement framework, and have a different kind of conversation about health.

Participants will:

  • Learn the three themes of the HM2020 framework
  • Learn to conceptualize health beyond the illness or health care perspectives
  • Learn about the factors that create health and the opportunity to be healthy, especially policy decisions
  • Be able to connect the HM2020 framework to their own work.


Presenters: Jeannette Raymond, capacity development planner, Minnesota Department of Health; Jacqueline Edison, senior services consultant, Minnesota Board on Aging; Heidi Hamilton, legislative lead, DHS, Disability Services Division


Hearing Loss- Memory Loss: Same symptoms, different program/planning needs

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Horizon Room 205, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic knowledge of service plan development for older adults, and how to adapt to fit the needs of people with hearing loss or people affected by both hearing and memory loss.

Description: People over 60 years of age have an increase in hearing loss (about 35% of the population) and an increase in the number of people with memory loss or dementia like symptoms. Often the conditions of hearing loss are mistaken as symptoms for memory loss. Studies have shown that the likelihood to develop memory loss increases for those who have untreated hearing loss. This workshop with discuss the similarities in symptoms and some strategies for identifying the root cause of the symptoms, discuss effective program and planning practices for people with both conditions, and explore practices that can help reduce the changes of development of memory loss symptoms that could result in more intensive service needs..

Participants will:

  • Learn how the symptoms of hearing loss and memory loss can often mimic each other and why
  • Strategies for identifying the root cause of the behaviors or symptoms so that treatment can fit the need of the individual
  • Ideas for working with people who may have both hearing loss and memory loss and accommodation/planning ideas to help maximize effectiveness of services or programs.


Presenters: Richard Diedrichsen, regional manager, DHS, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services


Holding your Client’s Frontal Lobe in the Palm of your Hand

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 203, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Any information on brain research, attachment theory, or sensory integration would be helpful but not necessary.

Description: This session will offer individuals an understanding of how brain research, attachment theory, and sensory integration when used together can help individuals achieve greater emotion regulation and independence. Individuals will receive new strategies to effectively teach skills to empower individuals with disabilities to utilize their strengths and gain or maintain more independence. Individuals will take away an understanding of the brain, attachment theory and sensory integration. These three areas will provide an understanding of behaviors clients may engage in, approaches to treat these behaviors and be able to share and empower their clients with this information.

Participants will:

  • Be able to use the latest brain research, attachment theory and sensory integration in the treatment of those they work with
  • Be able learn new strategies to help effectively manage clients emotions and empower greater independence in those they serve
  • Be able to put the information they gain from the session, which can be used in current programing and/or in developing future programs.


Presenters: Heidi Carlson, MD, consulting psychologist; James E. Campbell, LSW, program director; Wendi Keisershot, RN, C, program manager; Jim Van Meveren, program manager, all of Minnesota State Operated Community Services


Home and Community e-Care Technology: Products, Performance, Policy

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Ballroom 301 and 302, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: This session will explore a range of remote electronic technologies promoting community living by older adults and persons with disabilities. The basic characteristics, emerging applications, and a range of policy/program issues affecting adoption will be highlighted.
Participants will:

  • Learn about key existing and emerging technologies, their efficacy and cost/benefits
  • Learn about policy/program challenges in adopting these technologies.


Presenters: Diane Sprague, director, Lifetime Home project; Barb Turner, COO, ARRM


Housing Access Services: Circles of Support

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Room O, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of the service delivery system that supports Minnesotans who are eligible for Medical Assistance Home Care Services or waiver services.

Description: This interactive session will explore the principles of a person-centered approach and the innovative service delivery of the successful Housing Access Services (HAS). You will hear stories from the partners such as counties, HAS staff, parents, and people with disabilities. Moreover, you will learn about the expansion of HAS, new online training and videos developed to support the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) movement to recruit new providers. You will learn how the project focuses on people, not programs, and how partnerships have made the service successful. In December 2012, the project was presented with Commissioner Lucinda Jesson’s Circle of Excellence Award.

Participants will:

  • Learn how partnerships have been critical to the success of moving hundreds of people to homes of their own
  • Hear individual success stories and learn how to partner to help individuals move to homes of their own in their communities
  • Learn about the expansion of Housing Access Services and its ability to expand any community's capacity to fully integrate the individuals it serves.


Presenters: Scott Schifsky, program director, The Arc Minnesota


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Immerse Activities with iPads for Persons with Dementia/Alzheimer's

Monday, June 17, 10:15 to 11 a.m.


(INTERMEDIATE)
An interest in learning how technology can change lives of persons with dementia/Alzheimer's.

Description
: It is amazing how iPad technology can be used in creative ways for persons who need more support in their lives on a daily basis. The iPad is a great tool to enhance choice-making, providing direction/cueing, communication of needs, increase coping skills, and increase participation in activities. Also, the applications (apps) can assist in positive memories, positive social relationships through photos, the arts, music, games, story telling, exercise, positive affirmations, trivia, and health.

Participants will:

  • Come away with a greater knowledge and ideas of how technology can creatively support persons in being as active and connected with the world around them
  • Receive get a chance to see the apps on numerous iPads that are used by those experiencing dementia/Alzheimer's with amazing results.


Presenters: Colleen Timbers, program director, Paula Lindblom, support service coordinator, both from Merrick, Inc.




Improving Health Outcomes of East African Populations

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Split Rock 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Serving the health needs of immigrant populations takes understanding, innovation, and partnerships with community organizations. Immigrant populations face barriers to accessing health care. It is especially complicated for those who have chronic or life-threatening illnesses. UCare has the privilege of serving many East African immigrants. They experience a new health care system when arriving in Minnesota and face challenges in securing support for changing medical needs. This session will provide an overview of how one health plan used community-based public health-focused strategies to reach East African immigrants to improve their health and how these tactics can be replicated.

Participants will:

  • Gain a greater understanding of the challenges faced by elderly East African and immigrant communities in accessing care and understanding the US health care system
  • Learn about several successful initiatives and partnerships a health plan has implemented that improve the health outcomes of members
  • Learn how the concept of preventive medicine is viewed by the East African community and several strategies used to address health care outcomes in the western health care system.


Presenters: Jeri Peters, chief nursing officer, UCare


Improving Health with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Nutrition Education

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Horizon Room 203, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: The Department of Human Services, the University of Minnesota Extension, the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, and many other community partners are working together to help seniors and people with disabilities enroll in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps) and nutrition education programs. SNAP helps people purchase nutritious food, stretches budgets, and provides an economic boost to communities. Nutrition education for SNAP participants teaches the importance of a quality diet, how to purchase healthy foods on a limited budget, and how to prepare healthy meals with quick and easy recipes. Please join us to share your experience and learn more about how we can work together!

Participants will:

  • Learn about recent changes and outreach initiatives for SNAP
  • Learn about the SNAP-Ed nutrition education programs provided by the University of Minnesota Extension and the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe
  • Learn how to partner with or refer clients to SNAP outreach and SNAP-Ed nutrition education programs.


Presenters: Ryan Johnson, SNAP-Ed liaison, Ross Safford, community outreach specialist, both from University of Minnesota Extension; Nancy Hoyt Taff, SNAP community outreach specialist, DHS, Children and Family Services Administration


Increase Your Super Powers via MinnesotaHelp.info

Tuesday, June 18, 9:15 to 10 a.m.

DEMONSTRATION IN CYBER CAFÉ

(INTERMEDIATE) Participants should visit www.MinnesotaHelp.info and conduct some practice searches in order to derive the greatest benefit from the presentation.

Description: Put on your super powers cape and take a ride through www.MinnesotaHelp.info. Learn how to save time and find more resources using a number of new enhancements to the online local directory. See a demo of search strategies power users employ to find resource nuggets, see side-by-side comparisons of services, view Registered Housing With Services Uniform Consumer Information Guides, and find out how to save time when you have frequently search for the same type of services. Learn about recent enhancements to the site including housing vacancies for supportive and affordable housing providers and the portal agencies use to update their service information. Even more time saving strategies will be demonstrated and more tips and tricks will be discussed to add to your existing super powers. And, users will find out how to get help quickly using IM (Instant Messaging).

Participants will:

  • Know how to use multiple search strategies to find local services to meet their client’s needs
  • Know how to do a side-by-side comparison of up to 5 services and electronically send the comparison information to a client or caregiver
  • Know how to save frequently made searches.


Presenters: Mary Chilvers, resource management, Minnesota Board on Aging, MinnesotaHelp.info; Tom Gossett, program manager, Minnesota Board on Aging, MinnesotaHelp.info


Individual Housing Options–Which Door is Right for You?

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

French River 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) General knowledge of housing supports and services and be ready to think out of the box.

Description: Housing supports for people with disabilities and persons with behavioral health issues are evolving quickly and creatively. The current continuum of housing and housing supports will be discussed. Examples include supported living services, shared living "host homes," provider-controlled apartments, consumer or family controlled housing, and home ownership. A panel of county and DHS staff who have been a part of creative housing developments will share current best practices and cutting edge ideas to blend services and funding.

Participants will:

  • Expand awareness of written resources and tools available for individualized housing options
  • Be able to identify a variety of funding streams to provide staff support, rent, and food
  • Be able to draw on examples of creative housing models from group living to home ownership
  • Increase understanding of what Minnesota and other states are doing in the area of "host homes."


Presenters: Heidi Hamilton, legislative lead, DHS, Disability Services Division; Ed Sootsman, supervisor, Jerry Mellum, senior planning analyst, both from Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department; Winna Bernard, senior social worker, Washington County Social Services, Developmental Disabilities; Colleen Fodness, supervisor/DD waiver coordinator, Dakota County Social Services; Angela Lockhart, supervisor, Ramsey County Community Human Services


Innovation for One Sparks Change for All: Person-Centered Change

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Horizon Room 204, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Every systems innovation underway in Minnesota today is founded on – or calling for – an expansion of person-centered thinking and planning. These methods are broadly recognized as critical to delivering quality service for everyone, regardless of disability. This session will outline the Department of Human Services (DHS) plans to build capacity for person-centered thinking and planning. This includes structures to help Minnesota fulfill the broader purpose of person-centered planning as a catalyst for informed and meaningful systems change. Learn more about the Person-Centered Thinking and Planning Training Series, and why your participation in these efforts is critical to the future of services in Minnesota.

Participants will:

  • Learn how The Learning Community and The Institute on Community Integration are working with DHS to expand capacity for person-centered thinking and planning in Minnesota
  • Learn why this is important and how you can participate
  • Learn about person-centered systems change, specifically how person-centered thinking and planning can foster change beyond the individual level; lessons in systems change from other states
  • Learn about Minnesota’s plan to implement person-centered systems change, how you can participate, and why your participation is critical to success.


Presenters: Angela Amado, PhD, Anne Roehl, project coordinator, both from University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration


The Innovative Technology Enabled Care Model

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Ballroom 305, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic knowledge and understanding of technology support and options for older adults and persons with disabilities.

Description: This session will provide advanced information on the Technology Enabled Care model featuring health monitoring technology implemented by The Lutheran Home Association through the Minnesota DHS CS/SD grant project. This innovative care model utilizes advanced technologies as potential solutions to help individuals maintain independence, improve health and a significant cost savings. This engaging session will provide comprehensive techniques and strategies for providers and caregivers to integrate health monitoring technologies to enhance the service model. Specific strategies, challenges and innovation for rural health settings will be featured.

Participants will:

  • Learn more about Technology Enabled Care implementation strategies
  • Receive a demonstration of health monitoring technology
  • Have the opportunity to discuss the potential impact for rural health
  • Hear more about future research pilots.


Presenters: Catherine Berghoff, director of grant resource development; Michael R. Klatt, president and chief executive officer, both from The Lutheran Home Association; Joseph E. Gaugler, PhD, associate professor and McKnight residential fellow, University of Minnesota; Terry Hill, executive director, National Rural Health Resource Center


The iPad: Independent and Connected

Monday, June 17, 9:15 to 10 a.m.


(INTERMEDIATE)
Prior computer use is beneficial but not essential.

Description: Technological innovation allows people to stay connected in ways they have not been before. The iPad can be used to email family and friends, locate movies, music and books, and access the internet for research for checking scams and fraud. People can create independence by easy use of applications (apps) or programs that will create greater safety and opportunities to do banking and grocery shopping and creating automatic bill pay from their home. The iPad is simple to operate. Their will be demonstrations using voice over and zoom text.

Participants will:

  • Learn the ease and use of the iPad, its buttons, ports and operations
  • Gather knowledge on how to access the internet
  • Observe the ways in which the internet can provide independence and safety
  • Be come cognizant of applications and ways to stay connected with family and friends.


Presenters: Renee Youngberg, iPad specialist, Vision Loss Resources


IT Accessibility: How Does it Impact You?

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Horizon Room 202, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Understanding that IT accessibility is often a challenge; that there is a relatively new law requiring accessibility.

Description: Ensuring full, effective IT (information technology) accessibility affects our ability to: seek, apply for, and retain jobs; continue living at home; effectively manage our health; overcome geographic barriers; improve quality and efficiency of services; … and just about everything else we do. After a quick background on accessibility laws and standards, this session will delve into how attendees can: ensure their services are fully accessible; collaborate with other organizations and programs for accessibility; and best advocate for accessibility for their clients. Attendees will be asked to identify current barriers to accessibility and brainstorm on how to overcome those barriers.

Participants will:

  • Understand the basics of IT accessibility, including documents and websites
  • Articulate how lack of IT accessibility disproportionately affects older individuals and those with disabilities
  • Create a plan to identify IT barriers and strategies for overcoming them.


Presenters: Jay Wyant, chief information accessibility officer, MN.IT Central


ITNTwinCities: Innovative Senior Transportation

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Gooseberry Falls 3, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Experience identifying transportation options for active individuals living in the community.

Description: Transportation is a growing challenge for our aging population. Friends of ITNTwinCities is working to establish a local affiliate of ITNAmerica, a sustainable, community supported transportation model for older adults. ITN uses volunteer drivers in unmarked automobiles to provide dignified 24/7 door through door transportation for any purpose whatsoever. The innovative ITN technology offers nationwide data collection on rider member use and affiliate comparisons. We will provide details of the ITN model, describe our progress and challenges thus far and share how ITN can serve seniors, caregivers and the community at large.

Participants will:

  • Understand the basic attributes of the ITNAmerica transportation model: volunteer based, community supported, membership model, 24/7, any purpose, unmarked automobiles, no qualification barriers other than age
  • Be able to identify how the ITN model can address service gaps in the currently available transportation options for older adults in the Twin Cities
  • Learn how ITN can help seniors and their family members, and how health care providers, retailers and others in the community can benefit from a local ITN affiliate.


Presenters: Trish Halko, steering committee chair, Mark Hoisser, Liz Hagstrom, Arlene Forrest, Joelyn Malone, steering committee members, all from Friends of ITNTwinCities


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Learn How to Determine Financial Eligibility for the Alternative Care Program

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 204, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some knowledge if possible of what client income and client assets are.

Description: The Alternative care program is a state-funded program that serves seniors in their homes. County financial workers determine financial eligibility for all HCBS waiver programs but not for the Alternative Care (AC) Program. Case managers have the responsibility of determining service eligibility and financial eligibility for the Alternative Care Program. The MnCHOICES assessment will require Certified Assessors to determine financial eligibility for this program as well. This session will discuss the aspects of financial eligibility for the AC program and also will instruct the participant on how to use the financial eligibility worksheet to determine eligibility.

Participants will:

  • Learn details about how to determine financial eligibility for the Alternative Care program
  • Learn how to use the financial eligibility worksheets to determine eligibility for the AC program
  • Become familiar with AC financial eligibility.


Presenters: Libby Rossett-Brown, agency policy specialist, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division


Live Well At Home℠ - Breaking Into Risk Management Support

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Horizon Room 202, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Familiar with the Live Well at Home℠ framework and the Live Well at Home Rapid Screen© process.

Description: Live Well at Home℠ is a coordinated and integrated practice framework being used by professionals who are proactively assisting high-risk older adults sustain community living and delay spending down to Medical Assistance.  The model is grounded in the seven risk factors most predictive of causing older adults to move permanently from their home to a care setting.  Experienced staff from Great River Faith in Action will discuss their approaches and experiences in providing risk management support under this model to high-risk older adults and family caregivers.  Don’t miss this session if you want to “tune-up” your risk management support skills and improve outcomes for participants.

Participants will:

  • Learn the four-step risk management process and the core evidence-based interventions
  • Become familiar with key tools including the updated website, risk management protocol, and the new mobile phone app
  • Learn how to overcome obstacles and put risk management into motion
  • Learn three reasons for rescreening clients and tracking outcomes.


Presenters: Denice Freih, executive director, Jo Nesland, care consultant, Heather Van Cleave, caregiver consultant, all from Great River Faith in Action


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Making Life Easier: Low Tech Adaptations for Independent Living

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Ballroom 304, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: This presentation will present adaptive techniques that could be used to make life easier and more efficient for those who have low vision. Many of these adaptations can be described as low tech options to improving independent life. Topics will include, but may not be limited to: Adapting everyday items in the home and kitchen; Methods for marking/labeling items; the importance of contrast in aiding low vision; the importance of lighting, reducing glare and how to counteract it; adaptive items and where they can be purchased. If time, information about dual sensory loss, common causes of vision and hearing loss and the emotional aspect of such loss will be discussed.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to adapt everyday items in the home (e.g., measuring cups and spoons)
  • Learn methods for marking and labeling items for ease of use
  • Be able to explain the importance of lighting, contrast, and reducing glare in aiding low vision
  • Be able to identify adaptive items and where they can be purchased


Presenters: Jean Johnson, rehabilitation teacher, Vision Loss Resources; Paul Deeming, MS, CI, services and training coordinator, DeafBlind Services Minnesota, LLC


Making Person-Centered Planning the Center of Community Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Ballroom 301 and 302, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) General understanding of person centered futures planning principles and their applications within the human services realm.

Description: The process of bringing together individuals and community and of engaging older adults, their families, friends, and the communities in which they all live to create sustainable programs to meet the needs, abilities, and desires of all creates an exciting challenge. What is pie-in-the-sky; what’s reasonable; and why does it matter? What do these sustainable programs deliver and ask for in return? What are the special challenges and benefits? Who are the participants, and how can planners and policy makers engage these participants?  What investments need to be made to implement person-centered principles and to develop these innovative, sustainable programs? This open forum will provide an opportunity to listen, share thoughts and ideas, and envision a way to develop and deliver high-quality services and supports that can help individuals and communities realize their dreams and their potential.

Participants will:

  • Discuss the goals, who is involved, and the benefits to their own experience of aging
  • Describe what person-centered aging programs look like
  • Detail what person-centered futures planning looks like at a community development level
  • Prepare a list of 3-5 goals, and then 3-5 action steps to incorporate person-centered planning principles into their work and into local or regional discussions of person-centered futures development planning and supportive systems change.


Presenters: Britt Bassoni, program administrator, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division; Barb Caskey, EDP program coordinator, Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging; Beth Budziszewski, aging program developer and grants manager, Land of the Dancing Sky Area Agency on Aging; Dan Conway, EDP program developer, Southeastern Minnesota Area Agency on Aging; Nan Just, EDP program director, Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging; Kathy Gilbride, EDP coordinator, Central Minnesota Area Agency on Aging; Kate Selseth, EDP coordinator, Southwest Area Agency on Aging


Making Work a Part of the Plan—Embracing Values and Shifting Expectations

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Room M & N, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side
(BASIC)

Description: As expectations shift to making competitive work a part of the plan for people with disabilities, professional values and approaches will need to adapt. This session will challenge the pervasive myths that have shaped the historical perspective of employment for people with disabilities; provide tools and resources to help adjust messaging and work planning processes to improve work outcomes; cover best practices for helping people with disabilities find long-term employment success; and build skills to break down barriers to employment.

Participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of changing expectations around competitive employment for people with disabilities
  • Gain an understanding of how to take the calculated risks that can lead to real employment success for any person, regardless of disability
  • Gain an understanding of tools that can support new ways of thinking, strategies, and practices that lead to high-quality, independent, community-based, and fair-wage jobs.


Presenters: Lesli Kerkhoff, community supports supervisor, DHS, Disability Services Division; Jolene Thibedeau Boyd, director, employment & community services, Cassy Davis, employment manager, both from Community Involvement Programs


MHCP Enrollment & the New 245D License Requirements

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Builds on materials presented at the session Minnesota Statute 245D: How Will It Affect Me? @ 8 a.m. on Tues., June 18.

Description: This session is designed to help providers and lead agencies understand how to enroll in and maintain enrollment as a Minnesota Health Care Programs (MHCP) provider both during the transition and after the implementation of the Department of Human Services (DHS) 245D licensing requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS) and for Alternative Care (AC) Program.

Participants will:

  • Understand the DHS licensing and MHCP enrollment process for new and existing providers during and after implementation of the new 245D licensing requirements for waivered services
  • Understand forms and documents needed for both 245D licensing and MHCP enrollment
  • Understand how changes in the processes affect approval of providers on HCBS/AC program service authorizations and payment of claims
  • Learn about resources available and how to navigate to these resources


Presenters: Danni Bean, Katherine Finlayson, both from DHS, Licensing Division


The Minnesota Landscape: Supporting Caregivers Across the Lifespan

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

French River 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of caregiver support services

Description: Presenters will describe local efforts to support family caregivers across the lifespan, share results from a statewide survey of providers who offer caregiver support services, and provide insights how you can better support family caregivers.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the availability of caregiver support services in urban and rural Minnesota
  • Gain insights and hear recommendations on how survey findings can shape service offerings
  • Learn how results can be used to strengthen the professional and volunteer workforce through training and education.


Presenters: Emily Farah-Miller, program developer, Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging; Kirsten M. Johnson, community initiatives manager, Amherst. H. Wilder Foundation; Rajean Paul Moone, PhD, Moone Consulting, LLC


The MinnesotaHelp Network™: Connecting Locally to Best Meet Consumer Needs

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Horizon Room 205, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) A familiarity with the Linkage Lines and MinnesotaHelp.info would be of benefit to participants.

Description: The MinnesotaHelp Network™ is an integrated, virtual network. This session will describe the network, discuss how it was developed, how it has grown, and how new partners serving veterans and their families have recently connected to the network for ride coordination and connection. The session will provide information on how you become a partner in the network and benefits for partnering.

Participants will:

  • Learn how the network was developed and the history of this development
  • Be provided with opportunities for ways to partner and understand the benefits of this partnership if they participate
  • Describe the recent development within the network related to veterans and their families for transportation coordination and options related to rides.


Presenters: Elissa Schley, consultant, Minnesota Board on Aging, MinnesotaHelp Network™; Robin Thompson, Senior LinkAge Line® specialist, Elaine Spain, project coordinator, both from Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging; Fay Simer, transportation planner, Minnesota Department of Transportation, Office of Transit


Minnesota Statute 245D: How will it affect me?

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Split Rock 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Familiarity with home and community-based services would be helpful, but not necessary

Description: Minnesota Statute 245D was created during the 2012 legislative session as a new licensing chapter for select home and community-based service providers. At the time of this publication, the Minnesota Legislature is considering a number of amendments to the statute. During this workshop, attendees will learn which services will be licensed under the new Minnesota Statute 245D as well as learn about the standards that will apply to these services. Participants will also have a chance to ask questions and hear about possible future changes to the home and community-based services (HCBS) provider standards.

Participants will:

  • Learn the history behind the creation of Minnesota Statute 245D
  • Learn which services will be under the purview of Minnesota Statute 245D
  • Learn about the standards that will apply to the different services under Minnesota Statute 245D
  • Have a chance to ask questions about Minnesota Statute 245D.


Presenters: Charles Young, disability waiver policy lead, DHS, Disability Services Division; Katherine Finlayson, unit manager, DHS, Licensing Division


Minnesota's Olmstead Plan: An Update

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Room L, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Knowledge and understanding about programs for individuals with disabilities and related federal policy.

Description: In Olmstead v. L. C., the United States Supreme Court held that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires the placement of persons with mental disabilities in community settings rather than institutions. Learn how the recent work of creating a comprehensive Olmstead Plan in Minnesota informs how Minnesota's programs, services, and activities are administered in the most integrated settings appropriate to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Participants will:

  • Better understand the origins of Olmstead and Minnesota's planning process
  • Learn how Minnesota's Olmstead Plan will affect persons with disabilities regarding reasonable and appropriate placements
  • Become better informed about how institutional vs. community placements for persons with disabilities are defined.


Presenters: Gregory Gray (moderator), chief compliance officer, DHS, Continuing Care Administration; Loren Colman, assistant commissioner, DHS, Continuing Care Administration; Alex Bartolic, director, DHS, Disability Services Division; Jean Wood, director, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division & executive director, Minnesota Board on Aging; Melinda Shamp, clinical services & policy mental health program consultant, DHS, Adult Mental Health Division; Alison Niemi, housing opportunities manager, DHS, Transition to Economic Stability


MnCHOICES Millionaires

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Room M & N, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Join us for a session of "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" and learn the basics about MnCHOICES. The Department of Human Services and our lead agency partners (counties, tribes, and managed care organizations) are in the process of implementing a unique change in how Minnesota citizens are assessed for long-term service and support needs. MnCHOICES uses a Web-based application designed to identify what is important TO and FOR people of all ages and abilities. See a demonstration of MnCHOICES and learn the basics, and you might become a MnCHOICES millionaire!

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify at least two goals of MnCHOICES
  • Discuss what is different about MnCHOICES compared to how assessments were done historically
  • Describe the MnCHOICES "app."


Presenters: Cathy Griffin, MnCHOICES training lead, Nancy Jurgensen, MnCHOICES policy lead, both from DHS, Disability Services Division


Moving Home Minnesota: A New Transition Solution

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Ballroom 303, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of public programs and the challenges faced when attempting to be discharged from an institution after a lengthy stay.

Description: This presentation will offer an introduction to Moving Home Minnesota: the Money Follows the Person Demonstration and the services that it offers. Moving Home Minnesota assists people living in institutional settings to move into the community to a home where they can receive the services they need to be successful. This program operates across divisions within the Department of Human Services, including Adult Mental Health, Aging and Adult Services, Children's Mental Health, and Disability Services.

Participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of services included in Moving Home Minnesota and the people it serves
  • Learn the difference between Moving Home Minnesota and existing relocation efforts.


Presenters: Martha Aby, clinical capacity development specialist, DHS, Children's Mental Health Division; Mike Saindon, project consultant, DHS, Aging & Adult Services Division; Alison Niemi, , housing opportunities manager, all from DHS, Transition to Economic Stability


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New Pieces to the Medicare Puzzle

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Ballroom 301 and 302, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of Medicare and long-term care coverable services.

Description: This session will cover new information about Medicare as it pertains to the key areas of observation status, improvement standard changes, competitive bidding for durable medical equipment, prosthetics and orthotics, as well as diabetic supplies that begins on July 1, 2013. Overall updated Medicare information will also be provided. These far-reaching Medicare changes affect all Medicare consumers and virtually all Medicare providers. Presenters from the Minnesota Board on Aging and Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging will help beneficiaries and providers put the Medicare pieces together. Staff from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have also been invited to co-present.

Participants will:

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the Medicare Part A, B, C and D changes that affect most Medicare beneficiaries
  • Learn how to help beneficiaries understand and manage these changes, including the local community resources that can assist
  • Acquire the tools and information to understand what is encompassed by competitive bidding, observation status, and the court settlement over the Medicare improvement standard and how this may affect  long-term care work.


Presenters: Kelli Jo Greiner, team lead, Minnesota Board on Aging; Robin Thompson, senior outreach specialist, Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging; Ashley Setala, external affairs liaison/health insurance specialist, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Chicago Regional Office


Nursing Facility Level of Care Initiative: An Update

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 204, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Public health and/or social services experience working with older adults and people with disabilities, particularly in Minnesota's human services arena.

Description: The Minnesota Department of Human Services has planned modifications to the nursing facility level of care criteria, scheduled to take effect in 2014. Learn about how this initiative will affect public program participants, providers, and lead agencies, and how the engagement of stakeholders has played a key role in the planning and implementation process.

Participants will:

  • Learn what impact the nursing facility level of care changes will have on public program participants, providers, and lead agencies
  • Understand the roles external stakeholders played in the planning and implementation of the nursing facility level of care initiative.


Presenters: Douglas Silverman, program administrator, Jolene Kohn, state program administrator, both from DHS, Aging and Adult Service Division


Nursing Home Resident Relocation: County, Ombudsman and State Roles

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Nursing Home Resident Relocation: County, Ombudsman and state Roles

(BASIC)

Description: Several times each year nursing homes close, reduce their size or otherwise change operations in ways that require or encourage residents to move to another living setting. These events can be very traumatic for residents. The facility, county, ombudsman offices, DHS and Minnesota Department of Health have a critical role in ensuring an optimal relocation experience for affected residents.

Participants will:

  • Understand the process and major roles when a relocation occurs
  • Know where to find helpful resources
  • Understand recent changes to federal and state laws affecting resident relocations
  • Be prepared with strategies to recognize opportunities and respond to challenges that may arise.


Presenters: Robert Held, division director, Munna Yasiri, state program administration director, both from DHS, Nursing Facility Rates and Policy Division; Cheryl Hennen, state program administration director, DHS, Office of Ombudsman for Long Term Care; Sue Fehr, staff development supervisor, Hennepin Human Services and Public Health; Louise Starr, social services supervisor, Dakota County; Thom Johnson, supervisor,  Long Term and Managed Care, Ramsey County



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Own Your Future: What You Need to Know to Reach Out to Your Networks

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Room O, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some knowledge of long-term care and the general lack of public awareness about the issues we will all face as we age.

Description: Own Your Future (OYF) is a joint initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the State of Minnesota to encourage individuals to plan for their long-term care needs now in order to avoid planning during a crisis and to forestall unsustainable growth in Medicaid in the absence of such planning. The OYF effort is working with networks of organizations around the state to convey this message to Minnesotans and increase the “multiple touches” that people experience in order to increase the number who take action to create a plan. At this session, we will describe the OYF effort, preview the OYF website, and discuss ways that those attending can reach out to their networks and share the information about the OYF campaign.

Participants will:

  • Learn more about the OYF initiative and the information that individuals need in order to understand long-term care
  • Preview the OYF website and get feedback from the participants regarding additional or different information that could be posted on the site
  • Learn about ways that those attending can share information about OYF with their networks, including work, family, faith community, and other networks to which they belong.


Presenters: LaRhae Knatterud, director, DHS, Aging Transformation; Lt. Governor Yvonne Prettner Solon, State of Minnetoa


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Patient Centered Approaches to Parkinson’s and Dementia Management

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

French River 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: This session will address patient-centered strategies to manage Parkinson’s disease and dementia. The session will describe an ongoing pilot program designed to improve care and services for individuals living with Parkinson’s disease through innovative collaborative relationships and workforce development. The Struthers Parkinson’s Care Network (SPCN) brings the expertise and experience of Struthers Parkinson’s Center to independent, assisted living and long-term care facilities in both metropolitan and Greater Minnesota areas. This unique relationship gives facilities additional insight into the complexities of Parkinson’s symptoms through advanced training and ongoing education. Pilot program design, data collection, and outcomes will be reviewed.
Behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSD) are challenging to manage. BSD are a result of a multitude of factors. Psychotropic medications are not the first line treatment for BSD. Evidence based non-drug frameworks to address BSD, including the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold, will be reviewed for evaluating and addressing BSD. Person centered strategies for addressing dementia behaviors will be discussed. Case examples will be reviewed.

Participants will:

  • Be able to list key problem areas in Parkinson's care addressed through the Struthers Parkinson's Care Network project
  • Identify person-centered care and three non-drug interventions for dementia behaviors
  • Implement best practices to manage dementia behaviors.


Presenters: Sara McCumber, assistant Professor, The College of St. Scholastica; Rose Wichmann, manager, Struthers Parkinson's Center; Joan Gardner, clinic supervisor, Struthers Parkinson's Center


The Picture of Good Health: Bringing Focus to Persons with Disabilities

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Split Rock 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: You’ve probably heard the term ‘healthy lifestyles’ thrown around a lot in the last 10 years, yet pain, physical limitations, and lowered metabolism make it difficult for people with disabilities to maintain a healthy weight. In addition, the consequences of weight gain in this population can have a profound effect on health and independence. Courage Center and Legacy Endeavors offer affordable and accessible wellness programs tailored to people with disabilities, making it easier for this population to stay physically active. We will discuss our programs for people with disabilities and will present the health outcomes for program participants. Our programs have changed the way they support individuals with disabilities and have led to real, tangible lifestyle changes. Hear from the individuals who have benefited and how it has impacted their lives.

Participants will:

  • Learn about Legacy Endeavors’ and Courage Center's wellness programs
  • Learn about the outcomes that demonstrate the value of accessible wellness programs for people with disabilities
  • Evaluate current life situations using the healthy lifestyle wheel, identify areas in their lives they would like and/or need to improve, and make positive changes in those areas.


Presenters: Nancy Flinn, director, Courage Center; Amber Eisfeld, program directorAshley Oolman, program director, both from Legacy Endeavors


Powerful Tools for Caregivers: A Powerful Intervention

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

French River 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Long-term caregivers face unique caregiving challenges. The Powerful Tools for Caregivers Program, an evidence-based health program, provides self-care tools and strategies for family caregivers. Explore the Powerful Tools for Caregivers curriculum components, including self-care behaviors, management of emotions, self-efficacy, and use of community resources.

Participants will:

  • Understand the importance of caregivers and of caring for oneself in long-term caregiving situations
  • Explore strategies for positive self-care
  • Understand the Powerful Tools for Caregivers intervention and implementation strategies in the state of Minnesota.


Presenters: Becky Hagen Jokela, extension educator, Family Resource Management, University of Minnesota Extension; Debra Laine, special program developer, Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging


Prevent Diabetes in Minnesota through Community Partnerships

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Registration Area, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some familiarity with diabetes.

Description: People with prediabetes have increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Nearly 35 percent of US adults have prediabetes, including half of adults aged 65 years or older. In Minnesota, 1.4 million adults may have prediabetes, but only 210,000 are aware they have prediabetes. Rigorously designed studies show diabetes can be prevented or delayed among persons with prediabetes. The federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have launched a National Diabetes Prevention program (NDPP) based on curriculum shown to prevent diabetes. This session will describe how the Minnesota Department of Health, the YMCA, and HealthEast have partnered to bring the NDPP to Minnesota communities.

Participants will:

  • Describe the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in Minnesota
  • Identify the diagnostic criteria for prediabetes and diabetes
  • Describe the CDC's National Diabetes Prevention Program
  • Describe how the National Diabetes Prevention Program has been implemented in community settings in Minnesota.


Presenters: Marsha Hughes, director, HealthEast Care System, Community Health Improvement; Rita Mayes, diabetes drevention planner, Minnesota Department of Health; Sheryl Grover, director, YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities, Chronic Disease Prevention


Principles of a Mental Health Recovery System

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

French River 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of mental health/illiness services in Minnesota.

Description: The session will cover the main principles of a mental health recovery-based system consisting of a rehabilitation option and a continuum of care services. The implementation of recovery principles can shape mental health programs by developing and implementing services that are reflective of, and relevant to, the people we serve who are seeking success in a variety of chosen roles, settings, and communities.

Participants will:

  • Review the types of rehab options and continuing care services associated with the current mental health system in Minnesota
  • Learn the principles of recovery and implementation in practice
  • Examine how principles of practice ensure cultural responsiveness in a recovery-oriented mental health system.


Presenters: Melinda Shamp, clinical services & policy mental health program consultant, Helen Ghebre, program consultant, clinical services & policy mental health, both from DHS, Adult Mental Health Division; Dr. Richard Oni, executive director, Progressive Individual Resources II, Incorporated


Proper Protection from Neglectful Caregivers

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 3, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Familiarity with the concept of physical neglect resulting in harm; no prior legal knowledge needed.

Description: In 2012, caregiver neglect accounted for 43 percent of maltreatment reports in Minnesota. Groups around the state have been working for years to increase the criminal penalties for this offense. After a great deal of hard work and the tireless efforts of many stakeholders, in 2012 the Minnesota Legislature approved and Governor Dayton signed a bill that creates a felony penalty for intentional neglect of a vulnerable adult. The bill targets caregivers who intentionally fail to provide for a vulnerable adult’s basic needs, such as food, clothing, shelter, supervision, or health care. The new law marks the culmination of a multi-year effort of many members of the Vulnerable Adult Justice Project (VAJP) working collaboratively inside and outside the VAJP to reach this goal.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the VAJP
  • See examples of neglect that were not able to be charged at the felony level prior to the new law
  • Gain a better understanding of the types of situations chargeable currently and any cases that have been charged under the new law.


Presenters: Amy Sweasy, senior assistant, Hennepin County Attorney


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Real Meaning Beyond Spoken Words

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some experience working with non-Engish speaking clients preferred.

Description: This session will focus on how to reduce disparities experienced by non-English speaking Asian-American older adults and clients due to mainstream service providers more often being members of the predominant culture. Miscommunication across cultures creates a critical disparity that non-English speaking people face in this society. Most mainstream physicians, case coordinators and other service providers use interpreters or language line services to communicate with their non-English speaking clients. However, direct translation that does not consider the individual's cultural background and other aspects often results in severe impacts to clients' health and lives. This session will provide knowledge and resources to help participants communicate better with their clients.

Participants will:

  • Learn cultural background and other aspects of their Asian-American older adult clients
  • Increase knowledge of indirect expressions of Asian-American clients
  • Gain resources and information to collaborate with community-based organizations in order to reduce disparities for non-English speaking Asian-American clients.


Presenters: Yoonju Park, executive director, Korean Service Center; Kwangja Kwon, program director, Korean Service Center


Reducing Readmissions by Improving Care Transitions

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Ballroom 305, Harbor Side

(BASIC)

Description: Approximately 20 percent of Medicare patients discharged from Minnesota hospitals are readmitted within 30 days. This threatens the safety of patients and costs millions of dollars annually. Three Minnesota health care organizations jointly launched the RARE Campaign in 2011. The campaign engaged over 80 hospitals and more than 80 community partners across the continuum of care to reduce readmissions by 20% by Dec. 31, 2012. Campaign participants used data to identify and address opportunities for improvement in at least one of five focus areas. Campaign organizers are providing evidence-based tools and resources and individualized technical assistance to foster improvement.

Participants will:

  • Describe required actions to accelerate improvements in care transitions
  • Identify five focus areas that significantly impact patient safety and avoidable readmissions
  • Describe how hospitals, patients and community partners must work together across the continuum of care to prevent avoidable readmissions.


Presenters: Kathy Cummings, project manager, University of Minnesota, Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement; Janelle Shearer, program manager, Stratis Health; Kattie Bear-Pfaffendorf, patient safety and quality specialist, Minnesota Hospital Association


Reform2020: A Bipartisan Initiative to Reform Medical Assistance (MA)

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Room O, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) General knowledge of Minnesota's Medicaid program (Medical Assistance); general familiarity with disabilities and aging services

Description: Reform 2020 seeks to better meet the challenges of rising health care costs and an aging population, while still providing Minnesotans the services they need to lead fulfilling lives. Reform 2020 seeks to achieve these goals by modifying existing services, providing new services to targeted groups, and asking the federal government for a waiver to try new ways to deliver and pay for health care services that will ensure that people receive the right services at the right time in the right way.

Participants will:

  • Better understand the three goals of the Reform 2020 projects
  • Better understand the strategies to achieve these goals
  • Better understand details of the Reform 2020 projects themselves.


Presenters: Alex Bartolic, director, DHS, Disability Services Division; Jean Wood, director, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division, & executive director, Minnesota Board on Aging


Responding to Violence Against People with Disabilities

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

French River 1, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: People with disabilities experience violence and abuse at least twice as often as their peers without disabilities. As a professional working with people with disabilities, it’s important to be aware and be able to respond when an incidence of abuse is disclosed to you. It is also essential to be resourceful and collaborate with organizations and groups within your local communities to provide the best service to people with disabilities experiencing abuse. This session will focus on recognizing signs and working together to support survivors in our communities. In addition, we will discuss prevention strategies and tips for collaborating and cross-training to provide needed service.

Participants will:

  • Learn to educate professionals about the facts regarding abuse related to people with disabilities.
  • Learn to offer ways to increase awareness, education, and prevention strategies.
  • Learn to provide an understanding of importance of collaborating within your community.


Presenters: Erin Fontaine, project coordinator, Access North Center for Independent Living; Laura Birnbaum, advocacy and grant coordinator, Arc Northland; Linda Riddle, executive director, Domestic Abuse Intervention programs; Susan Terry, criminal justice liaison, PAVSA


 

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Self-Directed Services: A Solid Strategy for Community Living

Tuesday, June 18, 8 to 9:15 a.m.

Ballroom 301 and 302, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some exposure and basic understanding about self-directed services.

Description: Increasing numbers of older adults, persons with disabilities, family caregivers, and veterans are using self-directed services to live in the community. Under this model, people have choice and control over the community-based services and supports they receive. Join this session to learn from a panel of experts about how the model is being used across funding streams, which services and supports participants are buying, key consideration for the employment of direct support workers, ways to overcome barriers for using the option, and important tools and resources. And, don't miss hearing about the new veteran-directed Home and Community-Based Services option.

Participants will:

  • Learn how and why self-directed services are being used
  • Learn about key considerations for the employment of direct support workers
  • Learn why the model is successfully helping people of all ages live in the community
  • Learn about the future of self-directed services in Minnesota.


Presenters: Cindy Grebin, state program administrator principal, DHS, Disability Services Division; Ed Sootsman, social work unit supervisor, Hennepin County Human Services & Public Health; Vicki Gerrits, vice president service development, Lifeworks; Elaine Spain, program manager, Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging; Shantel Jaszcak, CEO, Consumer Directions Inc.


The Self-Discovery Process and Self-Advocacy for All Persons

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.


Gooseberry Falls 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Knowledge of the various types of PCP assessments (i.e., Essential Life Styles, PATH, MAP, etc.).

Description: Most people think as you age the self-discovery process and self-advocacy is not important. There is also the same premise for individuals with disabilities. This session will emphasize that having the person actively involved in decision-making is critical to his/her quality of life. The team at the Adult Day Services/Memory Care Services (working with persons who are 35 up to 90 years in age) at the North St. Paul location have conducted self-discovery assessments with interesting results that promote inclusion, independence, self-determination, and well-being. With self-advocacy principles, individuals are able to voice their ideas, goals and passions. From there, the question to professionals is: how can we make this work so the person is fulfilling their dreams? The speakers will share stories about learning the passions and gifts of persons and with this knowledge to promote connections with others to achieve their goals and dreams. They will also share stories about how these activities of making connections with persons without disabilities and supporting the life the persons desire.

Participants will:

  • See how the self-discovery processes can identify undiscovered passions and gifts of persons
  • Learn how self-advocacy can help persons voice their ideas, passions, and gifts to others
  • Discover how use of technology (i.e., iPads, iPods, environment) enhances the person's involvement in the world around them
  • Learn how to develop activities that connect them to others within their immediate communities.


Presenters:
Colleen Timbers, program director, Paula Lindblom, support service coordinator, both from Merrick, Inc., Adult Day Services/Memory Care Services


A Service Learning Partnership Modifying Homes for Safety

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Split Rock 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some knowledge of universal design, home safety and benefits of aging in place, as well as affordability issues in prevention.

Description: Falling at home presents a major threat to older adults’ health, and research shows that home modifications can help prevent falls. As a result, there is a growing need for professionals educated in evaluating homes and making safety modifications. To help aging individuals who cannot afford those safety features live in place, Rebuilding Together, a nationwide nonprofit organization, developed a volunteer-based program called “Safe at Home.” This presentation will describe an innovative and mutually beneficial partnership with Rebuilding Together Twin Cities, resulting in rich service-learning experiences for occupational therapy students at St. Catherine University and construction management students at Dunwoody College.

Participants will:

  • Review risks and barriers common in older adults' home environments and some home modification solutions aimed at improving safety and independence
  • Describe the partnership process between this nonprofit organization and higher education
  • Name some of the challenges, mutual benefits, and future direction of such partnerships.


Presenters: Catherine Sullivan, associate professor, St. Catherine University; Brent Suski, Kathryn Greiner, both from Rebuilding Together-Twin Cities; Heather Stafford Gay, principal instructor, Construction Sciences and Building Technology, Dunwoody College of Technology


Services for Individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnosis

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Ballroom 305, Harbor Side
(BASIC)

Description: This session will provide an overview of efforts to developing a new benefit that meets the needs of the growing and heterogeneous population of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis. It has been a challenge to develop a benefit that is based on best available and emerging evidence  Presenters will discuss what is unique about the Minnesota autism benefit plan, discuss the development challenges, as well review research results and feedback from stakeholders that went into the development of the new benefit.

Participants will:

  • Learn about a new unique intensive early intervention benefit for children with an ASD diagnosis in Minnesota
  • Better understand the challenges and work that went into the development of this new autism benefit
  • Learn about other state autism plans
  • Know where to go for additional questions.


Presenters:
Heidi Hamilton, legislative lead, Anne Harrington, autism coordinator, both from DHS, Disability Services Division


Sex in the 'Cilities: 100 Shades of Gray

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Horizon Room 205, Harbor Side
(BASIC)

Description: One Hundred shades of gray does not apply only to the color of our hair as we age. Sexuality can pose unique issues with the aging process. Please join us for an informative session on respecting, care planning and gauging safe sexuality for persons in long-term care settings using person-centered approaches.

Participants will:

  • Learn to address sexual behaviors that result from memory loss
  • Learn to discern and differentiate rights issues and provide resouces and case examples
  • Learn a person-centered approach to address and care plan sexuality for persons with and without memory loss.


Presenters:
Sandra Newbauer, regional ombudsman, Dan Tupy, regional ombudsman, both from DHS, Office of Ombudsman for Long Term Care


Special Needs BasicCare Program Update

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

St. Louis River Room, City side

(BASIC)

Description: Special Needs BasicCare (SNBC) is a medical assistance managed care program for people under age 65 with disabilities. In SNBC, health plans manage health care, while counties and tribes manage the waivers. In 2012, working in partnership, counties, tribes, health plans, providers, advocates, and DHS created successful transitions into managed care for over 30,000 eligible people ages 18–64. Learn about communication improvements and service integration between lead agencies, and about how enrolling in managed care has made a difference in people’s lives. Offer your suggestions on how SNBC could be improved.

Participants will:

  • Understand what SNBC is and who is eligible for it
  • Learn about the 2012 expansion of the SNBC program
  • Learn about how members have viewed their experience with SNBC through member success stories and testimonials
  • Learn how to access information about SNBC on the DHS website.


Presenters: Susan Kennedy,  Maggie Friend, both from DHS, Special Needs Purchasing; Becky Bills, Medica;  Archie Eliason, UCare; Nancy Hintsa, St. Louis County Public Health and Human Services


Stanford Self-Management Programs: Learning to Live Well

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Split Rock 2, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Join us as we discuss Stanford University Self-Management Programs in Minnesota. Chronic disease affects health, quality of life, and healthcare costs. Overall, chronic disease accounts for about 75 percent of the nation’s aggregate healthcare spending. Come and learn about three Stanford Self-Management Programs that address managing ongoing health issues, Chronic Disease Self-Management, Diabetes Self-Management, and Chronic Pain Self-Management. Information on the supporting research, implementation, and outcomes will be discussed. Courage Center will share its experience and research with clients who have multiple and complex chronic conditions. Take the opportunity to learn how you or your organization can become involved by offering programs, being a host site, or being a referral source.

Participants will:

  • Define self-management and identify current Stanford programs offered in Minnesota
  • Understand the research and structure that makes these programs effective
  • Identify how one or more of these programs can benefit clients
  • Understand how individuals or organizations can be involved.


Presenters: Mary Hertel, EBHP coordinator/trainer, Central MN Council on Aging; Jenny Fransen, RN, care coordinator for health care home, Stephanie Foo, project specialist, both from Courage Center


Status of Long-Term Services and Supports in Minnesota

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 1, City Side
(INTERMEDIATE) A working knowledge of existing long-term services and supports in Minnesota

Description: The Minnesota Department of Human Services is working on a legislative report on the status of the full range of long-term care services and supports for older adults and for children and adults with disabilities and/or mental illnesses in Minnesota. Learn more about the process used to gather the information and what the department has learned so far. Presenters will discuss the gaps analysis survey sent to counties in March 2013, the analysis being conducted on existing data, and the stakeholder input process conducted statewide by an external contractor.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the process used to compile the legislative report regarding the status of long-term services and supports in Minnesota
  • Learn about the findings of the broad stakeholder input process conducted statewide
  • Learn about the results of the statewide gaps analysis survey.


Presenters:
Kari Benson, planning coordinator, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division; Jennifer Strei, fiscal and budget analyst, DHS, Disability Services Division; Cecelia Dodge, Liz Freeman, The Improve Group


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Take a MnCHOICES Test Drive!

Monday, June 17,  and Tuesday, June 18, During all exhibit hall breaks and events

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of how a comprehensive assessment helps professionals to select appropriate long-term services and supports.

Description
: If you have not had a chance to "drive" the innovative MnCHOICES assessment and support planning application, join us for a test drive. Counties, tribes and managed care organizations are currently transitioning to the MnCHOICES app which replaces a multitude of paper assessments. MnCHOICES improves our ability to provide more consistent eligibility determinations for a variety of programs and services that meet the long-term service and support needs of Minnesotans of every age and disability. We will provide laptops. Stop by and get a hands-on opportunity to see how it works.

Participants will:

  • Examine the components of MnCHOICES including Intake, Assessment, Health Risk Assessment and the Assessment Summary
  • Enter data elements into MnCHOICES to see how information is gathered and documented
  • Gain a sense for how MnCHOICES functions.


Presenters: Cathy Griffin,  MnCHOICES training lead, DHS, Disability Services Division; Nancy Jurgensen, MnCHOICES policy lead, DHS, Disability Services Division



Technology for Individuals with Special Needs: A Hands-on Experience

Monday, June 17, 8:15 to 9 a.m.

(BASIC)

Description: This is a hands-on experience with iPads. Attendees will be able to explore hundreds of different apps, learn about iPad and accessibility features, and other resources available. This is a very informative session aimed towards parents and professionals wanting to learn more about iPads and how to use it.

Participants will:

  • Be able to work hands on and explore different apps and features of the iPad and ask questions to presenters
  • Be able to gain information and resources on general operations of the iPad
  • Be able to discover ways that presenters have incorporated iPads into the daily curriculum and routines of their many different programs
  • Be able to leave with a better understanding of how to use the iPad as an assistive technology device and the benefits it brings for individuals with special needs


Presenters: Julie Lowe, early intervention and recreational services program director, Ashley Robinson, autism preschool program director, both from Hattie Larlham



Topics in Public Guardianship

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

French River 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Knowledge of guardianship specifically the legal process and guardian responsibilities, and an understanding of the interplay between courts, DHS oversight, and local delegation.

Description: A broad overview of public guardianship will be presented from nomination to annual monitoring to case closing.  Participants will have the opportunity to discuss questions and problems encountered by county staff acting as local guardians of public wards.

Participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of the scope of public guardianship as it relates to persons under the guardianship of the Commissioner of the Department of Human Services, statewide and locally
  • Learn the basic process of nomination, legal process, and guardian powers and duties
  • Have the opportunity to explore the more finite responsibilities of guardians under law and rule, including ethical considerations for decision-making and end-of-life planning.


Presenters: John Fillbrandt, public guardianship administrator, DHS, Disability Services Division



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Updating the Health Environment for Hmong Elders

Tuesday, June 18, 8 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

Room L, Lake Superior Ballroom, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Familiarity with the Hmong community and basic understanding of their history helpful but not required.

Description: The workshop will consist of a multi-media presentation of case study best practices, interactive activity, and discussion. Topics covered will include strategies and information on how to support and update Hmong elders' attitude and beliefs regarding modern health care. The topic aligns with the conference theme of narrowing service disparities for minority populations and improving and redesigning the system for one of Minnesota's largest ethnic service groups, Hmong elders.

Participants will:

  • Take home strategies for working and communicating with Hmong elders in regard to their health care
  • Be introduced to new resources and ideas for more effectively working with and understanding Hmong elders’ attitudes towards health care and mainstream community interaction
  • Learn ways to thoughtfully engage with Hmong elders
  • Have the opportunity to discuss and engage with Hmong elder care provider experts.


Presenters: Ilean Her, CEO, Bee Yang Her, president, Neng Chu Lee, Cher Pao Vang, Sia Xiong, program participants, all from Hmong Elders Center, Inc.


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Waiver Review Initiative: Using Data to Drive Service Improvements

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 2, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of Medical Assistance Waivers (CAC, CADI, BI, DD, EW) and the AC program; Home and Community Based Services

Description: The second round of the Waiver Review Initiative is under way! These onsite lead agency reviews continue to ensure technical compliance with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations; provide technical assistance to counties, and identify best practices and quality improvement opportunities. The reviews also use some new tools, including performance data focusing on program sustainability and participant quality of life. This presenters will share these tools, discuss the reviews’ focus on program improvements and best practices, and highlight findings from approximately 25 counties reviewed so far.

Participants will:

  • Understand the history and goals of the Waiver Review Initiative.
  • Learn about the tools utilized during the review process, specifically how and why performance data is shared with each lead agency
  • Discuss examples of what Minnesota counties are doing to implement best practices and improve services to waiver participants
  • Learn some of the preliminary findings from the second round of waiver reviews.

Presenters: Julia Wallis Holmoe, agency policy specialist, Jean Martin, agency policy specialist, both from DHS, Continuing Care Administration


What Gets Measured Gets Done

Tuesday, June 18, 2:45 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Horizon Room 204, Harbor Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Basic understanding of long-term services and supports for people with disabilities and older persons.

Description: The Department of Human Services (DHS) Continuing Care Administration (CCA) places a high priority on results-based performance and on fostering a results-based culture. CCA sets the tone for this culture through the use of Results-Based Accountability as the model for performance management work. This work is essential to providing data-driven decision making that informs public policy decisions for seniors and people with disabilities. The discussion will include the Waiver Review Initiative, CCA Hall of Results, CCA performance reports, public DHS dashboards, and interactive reports.

Participants will:

  • Learn about CCA performance measures
  • Understand how performance measures are used in data-driven decision making
  • Review and discuss trends in performance measures for programs and services
  • Learn where to find the information on the DHS public Web site.


Presenters: Kim Anderson, project manager and planning specialist, DHS, Continuing Care Administration; Jan Radatz, agency policy specialist, DHS, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services


What’s Different About Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Aging?

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Split Rock 1, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: Whether you know it or not, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders are probably part of your client census. Learn about the unique issues facing these populations and how these issues affect their willingness to seek out services. This session will outline issues of LGBT aging, increase service provider awareness about the diversity of sexual orientations and gender identities among senior clients, present findings from a recent needs assessment, and identify actions you can take to make your practice and organization, more LGBT culturally competent.

Participants will:

  • Understand the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity and the most appropriate language to use when working with LGBT elders
  • Know the significant risks that LGBT elders face and the reasons LGBT elders are reluctant to seek formal social services
  • Learn about three environmental changes organizations can make to become more welcoming to LGBT elders.


Presenters: Mary Chilvers, volunteer trainer, Rajean Moone, volunteer trainer and researcher, both from Training To Serve


Where Will Boomers Live in their Later Years?

Tuesday, June 18, 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 1, City Side

(INTERMEDIATE) Some knowledge of housing with services offered in Minnesota and/or the types of senior housing options available. Description: By 2030, Minnesota will have over 1.3 million persons over 65, many of them baby boomers. Experts predict that boomers will have different sensibilities about what they want in their old age since they have changed society in every other phase of their lives. One of the key areas where these new preferences may appear is long-term care. Where and how will boomers receive services as they grow older? Many are betting they will move to “amenity-rich” senior housing as they age. Yet, whether large numbers will do this is an open question. The answer has enormous implications for our state’s long-term care system and its growing use of senior housing as the primary delivery system for long-term care services. This session will provide some basic data regarding Minnesota’s unique system of housing with services and encourage dialogue among attendees regarding the future.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the number of senior housing units in Minnesota compared to other states
  • Understand our use of housing with services compared to home care in the individual’s original home, and discuss possible explanations of these use patterns
  • Discuss the preferences Minnesota’s boomers have stated for housing and service supports in their later years, and the future implications of these preferences vis a vis our current system.


Presenters: LaRhae Knatterud, director, DHS, Aging Transformation; Todd Stump, program administrator, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division


Why do Adults Need Protection?

Monday, June 17, 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Gooseberry Falls 3, City Side

(BASIC)

Description: This workshop will include an overview of Minnesota's Vulnerable Adult Act and the reporting process, emergency protective services, investigations, and client-service referrals that the act mandates. Presenters will specifically discuss assessing self-neglecting adults, risk vs. safety, and current best practices.

Participants will:

  • Describe the goal of Minnesota's adult protection reporting process
  • Describe the process of assessing vulnerable adult self-neglect
  • Explain how people within various organizations work together to protect vulnerable adults.


Presenters: Jennifer Kirchen, Mary McGurran, both from adult protection, DHS, Aging and Adult Services Division

Updated 4/22/13

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This information is available in other forms to people with disabilities by contacting us at 651-431-2500 or 1-800-882-6262
or through the Minnesota Relay Service at 711 or 1-800-627-3529 (TDD), 1-877-627-3848 (speech-to-speech relay service).