The Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities
Promoting Independence, Productivity, Self-Determination, Integration and Inclusion
MNDisability.gov

Position Statements of the Minnesota Governor's
Council on Developmental Disabilities


Approved by the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities
Jackie Mlynarczyk, Council Chair, February 6, 2002

FINDINGS OF CONGRESS
PURPOSE OF COUNCILS IN P.L.106-402
MISSION
BELIEFS

ABUSE
ACCESSIBILITY
ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS)/HIV
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
AVERSIVE INTERVENTIONS
CASE MANAGEMENT/SERVICE COORDINATION
CHOICES
COMMUNICATION
CONSTITUTIONAL AND CIVIL RIGHTS
DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION
EDUCATION
EMPLOYMENT
FAMILY SUPPORT
HEALTH CARE
HOME & HOUSING
PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE
PERSONAL ASSISTANCE SERVICES
PUBLIC AWARENESS AND EDUCATION
SELF-DETERMINATION/SELF ADVOCACY
SERVICE PROVISION BY MULTIPLE AGENCIES
TRANSPORTATION

 

Back to Top

FINDINGS OF CONGRESS

According to Public Law 106-402, Congress finds that disability is a natural part of the human experience that does not diminish the right of individuals with developmental disabilities to live independently, to exert control and choice over their own lives, and to fully participate in and contribute to their communities through full integration and inclusion in the economic, political, social, cultural, and educational mainstream of United States society.

Back to Top

PURPOSE OF COUNCILS IN P.L.106-402

The purpose of the State Councils on Developmental Disabilities is to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that will contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family centered, comprehensive system of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that enable individuals with developmental disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.

Back to Top

MISSION

The mission of the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities is to provide information, education, and training to build knowledge, develop skills, and change attitudes that will lead to increased independence, productivity, self determination, integration and inclusion

(IPSII) for people with developmental disabilities and their families.

Back to Top

BELIEFS

  • "Segregation is the way in which society tells a group of human beings that they are inferior to other groups of human beings in society." (Testimony of Kenneth Clarke, Brown vs. Board of Education, 1954.)
  • People with developmental disabilities are citizens with the same rights to life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and equal treatment under the law as other citizens.
  • People with developmental disabilities are more like everyone else because everyone has abilities and limitations.
  • All people are unique individuals, having worth, no matter the degree of their disability.
  • People with developmental disabilities have the right to make choices for themselves and have maximum control over their own lives.
  • Neighborhoods and communities must be encouraged to include people with disabilities.
  • The creation of the sense of community is built upon the capacity of people served, not on their needs.
  • People with developmental disabilities should be given the supports and services they need in their home communities where they live, learn, work and play.

Back to Top

ABUSE

People have the right to live free from abuse, neglect, injuries and preventable death.

Back to Top

ACCESSIBILITY

As much as possible, the places and things that people use should be universally designed so everybody can use them.

Back to Top

ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS)/HIV

People with developmental disabilities should be protected against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by:

  • Getting public education programs about safe sexual practices and the dangers of intravenous drug use.
  • Assuring that health care workers, who are AIDS/HIV positive, use universal precautions as prescribed by the Centers for Disease Control.
  • Making sure that health care providers adhere to all federal and state regulations.

Back to Top

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Assistive technology should be available to people with developmental disabilities to increase their independence and give them more control over their lives.

Back to Top

AVERSIVE INTERVENTIONS

All aversive procedures should stop.

Back to Top

CASE MANAGEMENT/SERVICE COORDINATION

People with developmental disabilities and their families should be able to choose who provides service coordination to them.

Service coordination should:

  • Make sure each person gets a person-centered plan
  • Assure people get quality services
  • Respect the right of each person to make choices based on good information.

Back to Top

CHOICES

People with developmental disabilities have a right to decide how they live their lives including where they live, where they go to school, where they work, what they do in their spare time, and who their friends will be. They also have a right to make choices based on good information about their personal goals in life and should receive the support they need to be a real part of the community and interact with people who do not have disabilities.

Back to Top

COMMUNICATION

All people with disabilities, right from birth, are entitled to opportunities to communicate in the most effective manner. Other people should pay attention to what they have to say, however they express it. All people with developmental disabilities should have access to the appropriate tools and equipment to help them communicate better.

Back to Top

CONSTITUTIONAL AND CIVIL RIGHTS

The Americans with Disabilities Act should be enforced to protect the rights of individuals with developmental disabilities. The law says that all people with developmental disabilities should be able to use all services just like everybody else.

It is against the law to refuse people with developmental disabilities services because of their disabilities. Discrimination is not allowed in housing, zoning, voting, transportation, medical care, economic programs, education, employment, and habilitation.

Back to Top

DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead Decision should be used to:

  • Help people with disabilities move out of nursing homes,
  • Assure that fewer people with mental illness live in Regional Treatment Centers,
  • Close ICF/MR beds
  • Support community programs with the money from nursing homes, RTCs and ICF/MR beds, so that people get the services, support and protection they need.

Back to Top

EDUCATION

All students with developmental disabilities should get a free and appropriate public education. They should be in classes with non-disabled students of their age.

All students with developmental disabilities should get all the support they need for self-determination, participation and choice that include:

  • The rights of children under age five to receive Early Intervention Services through a comprehensive and coordinated interagency effort.
  • The legal rights of students and families to be part of any decision made about educational placement and services.
  • Education that is sensitive to the family’s situation, and language, socioeconomic and cultural differences.
  • Extended school year programs available for students who need them.
  • Formal transition planning beginning at age 14 so there will be a smooth transition to employment and/or advanced educational and training opportunities.
  • School policies and programs that improve the educational performance of all students with disabilities.

Back to Top

EMPLOYMENT

People with developmental disabilities should be supported to get integrated and competitive employment, and live lives of independence and inclusion. The Rehabilitation Act supports this belief. People with developmental disabilities should fully participate in all state and federal jobs programs.

Integrated employment opportunities should include:

  • Employers hiring people with developmental disabilities directly to work alongside people without disabilities and be supported by them.
  • Making sure the choices and needs of people with developmental disabilities determines what job is selected and how the individual is supported to hold on to the job.
  • The option of people with developmental disabilities to control and direct the funding and resources allocated on their behalf for employment.
  • Students with developmental disabilities being able to have integrated employment when they leave school.
  • Supporting people to have careers. Over time, people get promoted, get better pay, take on more responsibilities and different kinds of work, have more choice about what they do, and have better working conditions.

Back to Top

FAMILY SUPPORT

The family is the best source of support for a person with developmental disabilities. Family support services should address the needs of the entire family including children with disabilities, parents and siblings.

Family support services must:

  • Give families control of resources so they have as much choice as possible over the supports and services they receive.
  • Provide the necessary training so that families can make informed choices.
  • Be flexible and individualized so families get the supports they need to maintain their children at home.
  • Allow parents of children with developmental disabilities under 18 years old to recover the costs of care they provide when they are not able to work at all, or full time so they can care for their child.
  • Build on the family’s network of supportive neighbors, extended families, friends, and community networks.
  • Affirm and strengthen families’ cultural, racial and linguistic identities and strengthen their ability to function in a multi-cultural society.
  • Make sure children with disabilities and their families are integrated and participate in the community to the greatest extent possible.

Back to Top

HEALTH CARE

People with developmental disabilities should have the same access to healthcare as the general population such as:

  • Non-Discrimination: People with disabilities of all ages and their families must be able to fully participate in the nation's health care system.
  • Comprehensiveness: People with disabilities and their families must be able to use a health care system that make sure they get a comprehensive array of health, rehabilitation, personal, and support services across all service categories and sites of service delivery.
  • Appropriateness: People with disabilities and their families should get comprehensive health, rehabilitation, personal, and support services on the basis of individual need, preference, and choice.
  • Equity: People with disabilities and their families must be able to participate in the nation's health care system on an equitable basis. They should not be burdened with disproportionate costs.
  • Efficiency: People with disabilities and their families must be able to use a health care system that provides the most appropriate effective quality services with the least amount of administrative waste.

Back to Top

HOME & HOUSING

People with developmental disabilities have the right to freely choose where and with whom they live and we believe that:

  • People with developmental disabilities should have the opportunity to live in homes similar to people without disabilities, including owning a home of their own.
  • All children need a home with a family who provides an atmosphere of love, security and comfort.
  • All people with developmental disabilities have a right to live in their local community with citizens who are not disabled and be fully included.
  • Funding for supports and services must follow the person and not be tied to a facility or location.
  • Carefully planned supports and services must be of high quality and meet the needs of the individual.

Back to Top

PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE

People with developmental disabilities and their families should expect that agencies that provide services and supports will measure results, set improvement goals, improve overall effectiveness and capabilities, and strive toward best practices.

Back to Top

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE SERVICES

The federal Medicaid Community-Based Attendant Services and Support Act, known as MiCASSA, is a good idea. It has the following parts:

  • Attendant services that are functional, community-based, and provided in the most appropriate, integrated setting.
  • Consumers select, manage and control their attendant services.
  • Consumers control choices about how services are delivered, including vouchers, direct cash payments, fiscal agents and agency providers.
  • An "individual’s representative" is provided and authorized by consumers who are not able to direct their own care independently.
  • Staff are caring, competent, qualified, well trained and receive a livable wage and benefits.
  • Quality assurance programs are provided and promote consumer control and satisfaction.

Back to Top

PUBLIC AWARENESS AND EDUCATION

The awareness, sensitivity, and knowledge of policymakers, elected officials, state officers, and staff of generic organizations about issues affecting people with developmental disabilities should be increased.

Back to Top

SELF-DETERMINATION/SELF ADVOCACY

Self-determination and self-advocacy are essential to improve the quality of life for all people with developmental disabilities so that:

  • All children and adults with developmental disabilities should be supported and encouraged to make decisions throughout their lives.
  • People with developmental disabilities should be supported, assisted and educated to become active members on community boards and committees.

Back to Top

SERVICE PROVISION BY MULTIPLE AGENCIES

A single service provider should not have 24-hour control over the lives of persons with developmental disabilities. A provider of residential services should not also be a provider of habilitation or employment services for the same individual.

Back to Top

TRANSPORTATION

Transit services must be provided on statewide basis in a manner that is as adequate, flexible, responsive, and reliable as transportation provided to the general public, which includes:

  • Public and para transit services funded by all levels of government on a nondiscriminatory basis.
  • The strong enforcement of the transportation provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its regulations, including the ADA Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles.

©2014 The Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities
 370 Centennial Office Building  658 Cedar Street   St. Paul, Minnesota 55155 
Phone: 651.296.4018   Toll-free number: 877.348.0505   MN Relay Service: 800.627.3529 OR 711   Fax:651.297.7200 
Email: admin.dd@state.mn.us   View Privacy Policy   An Equal Opportunity Employer 

The GCDD is funded under the provisions of P.L. 106-402. The federal law also provides funding to the Minnesota Disability Law Center, the state Protection and Advocacy System, and to the Institute on Community Integration, the state University Center for Excellence. The Minnesota network of programs works to increase the IPSII of people with developmental disabilities and families into community life.