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Health for Young Adults

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Supporting young adults to make healthy decisions

College-age Minnesotans are at high risk for unhealthy behaviors during pregnancy.  They are also at a crucial time in their lives for building their future and face unique parenting challenges as they balance school, work and family life. 

Under health reform, Minnesota is helping college-age pregnant and parenting young people achieve their higher education goals and maintain positive health and well-being for themselves and their children.  

Health reform also helps prevent unplanned pregnancies through education programs to decrease risky behavior and strengthen healthy development among Minnesota youth. 

How does health reform support young parents in college?

Minnesota has received $2.26 million to help college-age pregnant and parenting young people achieve their higher education goals and maintain positive health and well-being for themselves and their children.  The funds support the Minnesota’s Young Student Parent Support Initiative, which will:

• Expand current services to young parenting students on campus
• Start new student parent centers at state colleges and community/technical colleges
• Reach out to young student parents through innovative technology and media strategies

How does health reform support healthy youth development?

Under health reform, Minnesota is implementing programs to decrease risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among our most vulnerable youth.  A three-pronged approach targeting teens, parents of teens, and caring adults will help to address Minnesota’s high rates of teen pregnancies and births, as well as soaring chlamydia rates. These efforts include Ramsey County, the most densely populated and racially diverse county in Minnesota

Other populations in Minnesota that experience high rates of teen births and STIs will receive high quality medically accurate and evidence-based programs. These populations in Minnesota include young people of color and American Indian youth, youth in foster care or aging out of foster care, youth in juvenile detention or on probation, runaway and homeless youth, and youth in alternative learning centers. Minnesota will target these populations geographically, with a special emphasis on the top 25 counties with the highest rates in teen pregnancies.