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Services for homeless youth enhanced with $4 million in grants

Thirty community organizations to provide services to homeless youth across Minnesota

February 10, 2014

Contact:
Katie Mintz
Communications
651-431-5605
Kathryn.Mintz@state.mn.us

PDF version of news release

With grants from the Minnesota Department of Human Services, 30 organizations across the state will soon provide additional services to homeless youth.

“Serving homeless youth is an urgent need,” said Human Services Commissioner Lucinda Jesson. “Providing these services now can lead to hopeful days ahead and bright futures. We have a great responsibility to act.”

Under contract with the department, the organizations will expand and develop additional services to fill needs in their communities, including street outreach, drop-in centers, emergency shelter, transitional living and supportive housing programs. Funding comes from a $4.2 million investment in the Homeless Youth Act made by Gov. Mark Dayton and the Minnesota Legislature last year.

The grantees are:

  • Ain Dah Yung Center, St. Paul – $84,000 for prevention and shelter
  • Arrowhead Economic Opportunity Agency, Itasca, Koochiching and St. Louis counties – $108,000 for street outreach, drop-in center and transitional housing
  • Avenues For Homeless Youth, Minneapolis – $192,000 for emergency shelter
  • Beacon Interfaith Housing Collaborative, Minneapolis – $225,000 for supportive housing
  • Bois Forte Band of Chippewa, Bois Forte – $105,000 for transitional housing
  • Catholic Charities - Hope Street, Minneapolis – $170,000 for transitional housing
  • Catholic Charities - Youth Supportive Housing, St Cloud – $215,000 for shelter and transitional housing
  • Evergreen Youth & Family Services, Bemidji – $100,000 for transitional housing
  • Face to Face, St. Paul – $192,000 for street outreach, drop-in center and transitional housing
  • Hope 4 Youth, Anoka County – $95,000 for street outreach and drop-in center
  • Inter County Community Council, Thief River Falls – $80,000 for transitional housing and host homes
  • Kulture Klub Collaborative, Minneapolis – $57,000 for prevention and drop-in center
  • Lakes & Prairies Community Action Partnership, Inc., Moorhead – $248,000 for prevention and transitional housing
  • Lakes and Pines CAC, Inc., Carlton, Pine, Aitkin, Chisago, Isanti, Kanabec and Mille Lacs counties – $190,000  for street outreach, drop-in center, transitional housing and host homes
  • Leech Lake Housing Authority, Cass Lake – $72,000 for transitional housing
  • Life House, Inc., Duluth – $254,000 for street outreach, drop-in center and transitional housing
  • Lutheran Social Service Metro Homeless Youth, St. Paul – $85,000 for transitional housing
  • Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota, Duluth – $105,000 for emergency shelter
  • Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota, Mankato – $75,000 for street outreach and drop-in center
  • Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota, Rochester – $95,000 for street outreach and drop-in center
  • Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota - StreetWorks, Hennepin, Ramsey, Anoka and Dakota counties – $144,000 for street outreach
  • Mahube-Otwa Community Action Partnership,  Detroit Lakes – $120,000 for transitional housing
  • Oasis for Youth, Bloomington – $72,000 for street outreach and drop-in center
  • Pillsbury United Communities - Full Cycle, Minneapolis – $125,000 for drop-in center
  • Scott Carver Dakota CAP Agency, Inc., Scott, Carver and Dakota counties – $185,000 for transitional housing
  • Teens Alone, Hopkins – $212,000 for street outreach, drop-in center and transitional housing
  • The Link, Twin Cities metropolitan area – $240,000 for transitional housing and supportive housing
  • The Salvation Army Booth Brown House, St. Paul – $144,000 for emergency shelter
  • YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities - Emma B. Howe, Anoka County – $85,000 for transitional housing
  • YouthLink, Minneapolis – $144,000 for drop-in center

With the additional resources, the state will be better able to fund a full continuum of programming, ranging from prevention to permanent housing, to serve young Minnesotans.

“I’ve seen the good work going on at Full Cycle Bike Shop in Minneapolis,” said Jesson, who recently visited the youth-run, nonprofit bike shop that addresses homelessness by connecting youth with training, employment experience and support services. “I am pleased that other community organizations will have the opportunity to provide services to youth.”

Minnesota’s homeless population has grown by six percent since 2009, according to the 2012 Wilder Research study, Homelessness in Minnesota (PDF). On the night of the statewide count in October 2012, homeless Minnesotans numbered 10,214.  Nearly half were youth age 21 and younger. More than 1,000 were youth on their own. 


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