Minnesota Repository of Coursework

Overview

The Minnesota Repository of Coursework is a searchable archive designed to help teachers and trainers share syllabi and course materials with adult basic education and WorkForce Centers statewide.

The system gives users free and instant access to materials they need to plan and deliver their course offerings.

No need to develop your own curriculum and course materials from scratch. MnROC provides ready-made syllabi, coursework, and resource materials developed and offered by trainers and instructors statewide.

Need course materials? They're easy to find on MnROC. Have course materials to share? They're easy to contribute.

Select this link to use the repository.

Getting Started

Rules For Contributing 
If you have course materials that are appropriate for adult basic education or WorkForce Center training, you are welcome to register as a contributor and submit your materials. This guide spells out the rules you'll need to follow for contributing to MnROC.

Before You Start
This short guide provides everything you need to know about entering coursework into MnROC. It includes organization information, tips on uploading your files to the Internet, and much more.

Information Gathered
This guide is a complete list of the questions and information you'll be required to provide when entering a program, course or workshop into MnROC.

Keywords
This guide is a list of the keywords used by MnROC contributors and guests to define or execute a search for coursework.

Template Examples
Syllabus Template

SHAPE Syllabus Example

Examples

  • Course Title Example: Tips on Creating and Entering a Course Title

    Remember to give your course a title that is descriptive and logical for someone searching for it in the repository. Course titles cannot be longer than 100 characters. Examples of appropriate course titles include:

    • Creative Job Search Workshop
    • ServeSafe®
    • MN Class D Driver's Permit Training
    • Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
    • HCCC 1000 Health Career Exploration
    • HCCC 1010 Behaviors for Success in Healthcare Settings
    • HCCC 1020 Communication in Healthcare Settings 
  • Course Description Example: Tips on Creating and Entering a Course Description

    Your short description should be short enough to be read very quickly, but long enough to give someone else a good idea of what your course or workshop is about. The maximum number of characters allowed is 500. Keep your description to about 3-5 sentences as shown in this example:

    This course provides information about the different types of healthcare workers in various healthcare settings. Included are education and licensure/certification requirements, scope of work, types of interaction with clients, peer groups and team members, and the impact healthcare workers have meeting the healthcare needs of clients. Also included is information about selecting, entering, and advancing in a healthcare career.

  • Course Duration Example: Tips on Entering a Course Duration

    Providing information on the length of time teachers and students participated in a course or workshop will help others plan better when they develop new courses/workshops based on your materials. You might be entering information for a short 2 hour workshop, or a course/workshop that's held across several weeks.

    Use these examples to provide information on the duration of your course/workshop:

    • 60 hours offered over 3 months
    • 2 hours offered over 1 week 
  • Student Population Example: Tips on Entering Student Population Information

    Providing information on the student population of a course or workshop will help others prepare for their target audience when they develop new courses or workshops based on your materials. It will also help them reach the appropriate target audience with their marketing efforts. 


    The information you enter is limited to 500 characters. Use this example to provide information on the student population for your course/workshop:

    This Nursing Assistant Prep Curriculum has been developed through a partnership with Minnesota Community and Technical Colleges. These materials are designed to benefit students who are still somewhat exploratory in their commitment to the nursing field and students who have made the commitment but demonstrate risk factors for success in the program. A certificate of completion from this course should indicate that the student understands the commitment they are making in enrolling in a post-secondary nursing assistant program, has the self and vocational knowledge to make a well informed commitment to nursing as a profession, and has developed the skills to successfully complete the rigorous academic program.

  • Prerequisite Example: Tips on Entering Prerequisite Information

    To reduce confusion, it's important to relay information on the expectations and prerequisites you determined were necessary for your course/workshop.

    Prerequisites are limited to 100 characters each, and up to 10 individual prerequisites for a course/workshop. Here are a few examples of prerequisites that have been used for Adult Basic Education and WorkForce Center courses and workshops. Some of these may apply to your program, or there may be others.

    • Algebra I
    • CASAS Reading Score > 210
    • GED or high school diploma
    • Internet Basics
    • Keyboarding

    Consider all of the prerequisites needed for your program and type them, one at a time, into the text entry box for this item.Click the Add Prerequisite button after each item to add it to the list. If your course/workshop has no prerequisites, click the check box next to 'No prerequisites.'

  • Selecting Keywords Example: Tips on Selecting Course Keywords

    Keywords are the primary search tool used by anyone searching the repository, so it's critical that you select all of the keywords that apply to your coursework.

    The keywords are divided into the five categories shown below. Multiple keywords can be selected from any of the five categories.

    • Sector
    • Occupational Content
    • Core and Specialized Literacy Skills
    • Preparation Skills
    • Licenses, Certifications and Credentials

    Review the full list of keywords, either by printing the list from the Resources, or by clicking on each of the five category links on the keyword page in the application. Make sure you select all applicable keywords when you enter your course/workshop. (e.g., You may be teaching a welding prep course that includes modules on teaching basic math skills.) In this case, you might select keywords for Welding (from the Occupational Content list) and Math (from Core and Specialized Literacy Skills).

    You must select at least one keyword, but be careful that you don't select keywords that are not appropriate for your coursework, or you may have to correct your selections before your course/workshop can be activated.

  • How Filters Work

    Filters are automatically available to someone searching the repository. As a contributor, you don't need to do anything to allow a user to search for your materials using filters, but you should be aware of what they are and how they work.

    Filters can only be seen in Search mode. Filters are used to reduce the number of search matches found. For Example, a search could be conducted on all coursework that has Nursing as a keyword, but it could also be done on all nursing courses entered just by one organization (e.g., Rochester ABE.) By selecting Rochester ABE as a filter, no other nursing courses would display. To view all courses entered by Rochester ABE (not just nursing courses) select Rocester ABE as a filter, with no keywords selected.

  • Entering Student Materials: Tips and Examples

    In this section, you need to provide a list of your student materials so that others who plan additional courses/workshops will be able to locate and repurpose your materials, and cite original sources. You need to cite all of your sources, including images and photos. This applies to all materials that you either did not write yourself, or that you wrote or created with significant influence from someone else's work. It's a lot easier than it sounds. These links and tools will help you:

    There are different formats for citing sources depending on the field of study. The standard for this repository is MLA. This link for the Citation Machine, www.citationmachine.net, will help you automatically format your source citations just by filling in the blanks. After you click the link, there are just four simple steps:

    • Click MLA in the left column.
    • Click the source type in the left column (book, magazine, online, etc.)
    • Fill in the blanks and click Submit.
    • Copy the citation text that is created by the tool, and paste and format it in your own resources document.

    Visit this URL for information to help you teach students about plagiarism and proper use of citation: University of Minnesota newsletter on plagiarism.

    Visit this URL to help you understand what types of materials need to be properly cited and how to avoid plagiarism: University of Minnesota - explanation of sources that need to be cited.

  • Entering Instructor Materials: Tips and Examples

    You need to provide a list of all teacher prep materials so that others who plan additional courses or workshops will be able to repurpose your materials and properly cite the resources you used. This section will help you add your list of materials to the repository and properly cite your sources, including images and photos. This applies to all materials that you either did not write yourself, or that you wrote or created with significant influence from someone else's work. It's a lot easier than it sounds. These links and tools will help you:

    There are different formats for citing sources depending on the field of study. The standard for this repository is MLA. This link for the Citation Machine, www.citationmachine.net, will help you automatically format your source citations just by filling in the blanks. After you click the link, there are just four simple steps:

    • Click MLA in the left column.
    • Click the source type in the left column (book, magazine, online, etc.)
    • Fill in the blanks and click Submit.
    • Copy the citation text that is created by the tool, and paste and format it in your own resources document.

    Visit this URL for information to help you understand plagiarism and proper use of citation: University of Minnesota newsletter on plagiarism.

    Visit this URL to help you understand what types of materials need to be properly cited and how to avoid plagiarism: University of Minnesota - explanation of sources that need to be cited.

  • Entering Core Content Areas: Tips and Examples

    For the purpose of creating a syllabus, limit your outline to the major content areas. Keep it simple. Use this example to help guide you:

    • Types of healthcare facilities
    • Types of workers needed in each facility
    • Scope of work, education and licensure/certification requirements for each type of healthcare provider
    • Roles of healthcare providers across a variety of settings
    • The role of teamwork in healthcare delivery
    • Eligibility requirement for healthcare employment 
  • Entering Goals: Tips and Examples

    Be as direct and specific as you can when you write the goal of this course or workshop. Start your goal statement with "The goal is to teach..." 

    Here are some examples of goal statements that you can use to help you write your own:

    • The goal is to teach learners about basic hygiene in a health care setting.
    • The goal is to teach learners the basics of welding.
    • The goal is to teach interviewing skills. 
  • Entering Learning Outcomes: Tips and Examples

    When you document your expected learning outcomes, write the stated outcomes in a way that makes them specific and quantifiable using an action verb and an outcome tied to the goal.

    Use these examples to help you write your own:

    • At the end of this unit, the student will be able to discuss healthcare fields and the types of workers needed.
    • After completing the activities in this course, the student will be able to write a description of the ways (educational and entry requirements) in which individuals can enter and advance within a healthcare career.
    • At the end of this workshop clients will be able to search for jobs using the MinnesotaWorks.net website. 
  • Entering Student Evaluation Methods: Tips and Examples.

    Clearly document the criteria used to show successful completion by a student in this course/workshop. Use these examples of student evaluation methods to help you document your own:

    • Pass/No Pass Example:
      Students receive a pass/no pass grade based on completion of all course assignments.
    • Assessment Example:
      Student must achieve a score of 236 or higher on CASAS reading assessment.
    • Graded Example:
      To pass these courses students must have a "C" or better. (A=93-100%, B=85-92%, C=77-84%). Grades are based on three areas:
    • Multiple choice and short answer quizzes (35% of grade).
    • In-class and homework assignments (35% of grade).
    • Class participation–come to class on time, participate (30%).
    • No Evaluation Methods Example:
      There is no evaluation for this workshop.
  • Entering Student Expectations: Tips and Examples.

    MnROC provides you with a comprehensive list of common student expectations, and allows room for you to enter your own. You may have course specific expectations such as:

    • Bring your tools to class each week
    • Post your blog entry on the class blog by Tuesday evening
    • Gather your protective gear at the start of the class period
  • Entering a URL: Tips and Examples

    Enter the URL that links directly to your course materials. This will allow others to download your materials.

    If your IT Support staff helped you set up your files on a local server, they will provide you with this link. If you created a WIKI and uploaded your information yourself, your URL will look something like this: http://NW-ABE-Welding.pbworks.com/.

    You can open a browser, navigate to your home page or WIKI page, and copy the URL to paste directly into this field.

  • Entering a Detailed Description of Course Materials: Tips and Examples

    The short description of your materials should be short enough to be read very quickly, but long enough to give someone else a good idea of what's involved in using your materials. Did you use Word documents or PDFs? Are you using online materials, or a learning management system? Keep your description to about 3-5 sentences as shown in this example:

    These course materials include 12 student handouts (Word docs), 12 teacher PowerPoints, 4 interactive exercises using Internet resources and information on a 1 week internship.

  • Entering a Program Title: Tips and Examples

    Name your program with a title that is concise and descriptive. Use these examples if you need assistance:

    • Certified Nursing Assistant Prep
    • Medical Coding Prep
    • Welding Prep
    • GED Preparation 
  • Program Description Example: Tips on Creating and Entering a Program Description

    Your program description should be short enough to be read very quickly, but long enough to give someone else a good idea of what your program involves. The maximum number of characters allowed is 500. Keep your description to about 3-5 sentences as shown in this example:

    This program provides training that leads to a Welding Certificate. It consists of three courses taught over a nine month period.

  • Program Implementation

    This question allows you to enter program information before the associated courses have been created.

    Its purpose is to let other Adult Basic Education or WorkForce Centers know that you are in the process of creating this to offer it as a program through your organization. You might have some of the coursework created, or still be in the planning stages. By letting other organizations know what you're working on, they may be able to collaborate with you by sharing information they have on similar training, or contact you with questions if they plan to set up a similar program.

    You can enter the initial information and return later to modify the program and link courses, or change the implementation status.

  • Program Prerequisites

    It's possible that your program might have different prerequisites than the individual courses linked to your program.

    Prerequisites are limited to 100 characters each, and up to 10 individual prerequisites for a program. Here are a few examples of prerequisites that you might use for your program:

    • GED
    • CASAS Reading Score > 210
    • NWRC Reading Score > 4
    • Internet Basics
    • Keyboarding

    Consider all of the prerequisites needed for your program and type them, one at a time, into the text entry box for this item.Click the Add Prerequisite button after each item to add it to the list. If your program has no prerequisites, click the check box next to 'No prerequisites.'

  • Program Partners

    Your program might have several supporting partners. It's important to let other organizations know about your partnerships so they can understand the scope of the work you have done. Did you enlist the partnership of a local community-based organization to create a healthcare training program? Are there other government or community-based organizations helping finance the program, provide students, or provide other resources? Did a MnSCU campus provide teaching assistance or space to hold one of your classes?

    This section provides a list of the MN Adult Basic Education Centers, WorkForce Centers, MnSCU campuses and Community-based Organizations. You may have also worked with local business partners which can be entered individually in the next section.

  • Business and Other Partners

    Some programs involve local business partners who may provide support through funding, classroom space, mentorships, internships, program guidance or student referrals. List the names of your business partners in this section.

  • Selecting Keywords Example: Tips on Selecting Program Keywords.

    Keywords are the primary search tool used by anyone searching the repository, so it's critical that you select all of the keywords that apply to your program. Keywords for programs might be different from keywords for an individual course that is linked to a program.

    The keywords are divided into the five categories shown below. Multiple keywords can be selected from any of the five categories simply by clicking the different links.

    • Sector
    • Occupational Content
    • Core and Specialized Literacy Skills
    • Preparation Skills
    • Licenses, Certifications and Credentials

    Review the full list of keywords, either by printing the list from the Resources, or by clicking on each of the five category links on the keyword page in the application. Make sure you select all applicable keywords when you enter your program. e.g., You may be teaching a Welding Prep program that includes a course on Math for Welders. In this case, you might select keywords for Welding (from the Occupational Content list) and Math (from Core and Specialized Literacy Skills). You might also select Welding Certificate (from Licenses, Certifications and Credentials) if your program leads to certification.

    You must select at least one keyword, but be careful that you don't select keywords that are not appropriate for your program, or you may have to correct your selections before your program can be activated.

FAQ's

  • If I sign on as a guest, can I still see all of the materials in the repository?

    Yes. Guests are able to search on all active keywords and see information for all active courses in the repository.

  • If I can see everything as a guest, why should I become a contributor?

    Adult Basic Education and WorkForce Training needs are similar across the state. Many instructors are part-time and some centers are struggling to keep up with client needs using limited resources. It's difficult to free up those resources to create new coursework and to keep up with technology. By sharing resources, we can provide all centers with access to training materials and programs they might not otherwise be able to provided to their clients. Contributors can also earn CEUs by organizing, posting and sharing their materials online through MnROC.

  • Am I entering a Course – or a Program?

    Most contributors will be entering stand-alone courses or workshops. You can enter a program when you need to create a link between more than one course. (E.g., if you have a FastTRAC grant project with several courses leading to a certificate, you will probably enter the courses individually, but then enter high-level program information to link those courses together. That allows someone looking at your material to see that these three courses are interrelated.

  • How do I enter my course materials?

    You enter syllabus information into the repository, but your actual course materials will be stored locally and a URL (link to that information) will be entered along with the syllabus information. Guests will use that URL to locate your course materials. You can either get your IT support team to help you post the files to and open location on your organization's server, or you can post the files yourself to a Wiki or other online location. See the wiki information in the "Contributors Before You Start Guide" for more information.

  • Where can I get more help creating a wiki?

    If you need more help than you're finding in the McROC resource center, check with www.TheMLC.org. They periodically offer wiki workshops.

  • I started to enter a course/program, but wasn’t able to finish. How can I complete the one I started?

    If you started entering a course, workshop or program into MnROC, and saved at least the first page, that information still exists in the repository. Log in with your contributor ID and select Modify Programs or Courses/Workshops.

  • How do I include old course materials if I don’t have an electronic copy?

    The best way to include them - in a way that is Section 508 compliant - is to rebuild them electronically using a word processor like Microsoft Word. That will allow screen readers to read the text. You can scan the documents, but scanning a document creates a picture of the document and screen readers are not able to interpret the image.

  • How do I get my materials on the Internet if we don’t have a support person?

    You can create a simple wiki and upload your documents to the wiki space. See Wiki information in the MnROC Contributors' Before You Start Guide. If that option doesn't work for you, contact the MnROC Administrator at: 651-259-7595.

  • Can I scan pages of a text book to include in my course materials?

    It's not recommended for two reasons: 1) Scanned images are not Section 508 compliant - screen readers are not able to read text from a scanned page. 2) Depending on the material, you may be violating a copyright. It's probably better to provide complete information about the source material which then allows someone to track down the source and obtain the materials directly from the book. For more information on copyright and plagiarism, use these links and tools:

    There are different formats for citing sources depending on the field of study. The standard for this repository is MLA. This link for the Citation Machine, www.citationmachine.net, will help you automatically format your source citations just by filling in the blanks. After you click the link, there are just four simple steps:

    • Click MLA in the left column.
    • Click the source type in the left column (book, magazine, online, etc.)
    • Fill in the blanks and click Submit.
    • Copy the citation text that is created by the tool, and paste and format it in your own resources document.

    For information to help you teach students about plagiarism and proper use of citation see the University of Minnesota newsletter on plagiarism.

    To help you understand what types of materials need to be properly cited and how to avoid plagiarism, see the University of Minnesota - explanation of sources that need to be cited.

    Remember: graphics, photos and other images are protected by copyright and must also be properly credited.

  • I just entered a course/program. Why can’t I see it in a search?

    When you finish entering information for a course, workshop or program, it is submitted in a "pending activation" status. An administrator will review the information to make sure it's appropriate material for an ABE or WorkForce Center, then change the status to "Active." If the administrator has questions about the material you entered, you may be contacted before the status is changed and the course/program is available for searching and viewing.

  • How do I earn CEUs?

    After a program or course you entered has been activated, return to the repository and click "Modify Programs, Courses or Workshops." Select the course you entered. The field on the right will be activated and will allow you to request and print your CEU certificate.

  • How do I print my CEU certificate?

    Sign on with your contributor ID and click the "Modify Programs, Courses and Workshops" button. Select Modify on the course for which you would like to request CEUs. Click the Request CEUs button on the right. You will be instructed on how to fill out the form and print your CEU certificate.

  • I’m stuck! Who can I call?

    If you have a question that isn't answered here, or with the additional MnROC resources, contact the MnROC Administrator at: 651-259-7595.

Definitions

CASAS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems)
CASAS is used to assess and place students in programs that meet their needs in the following skills areas:

  • Functional reading
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Speaking skills
  • Higher-order thinking skills.

For more information, visit www.CASAS.org.

TABE (Tests of Adult Basic Education)
TABE (Tests of Adult Basic Education) measures a person's English language proficiency in reading, math and language. For more information, visit the CTB McGraw-Hill website at www.CTB.com.

Accuplacer
Accuplacer offers a post-secondary level assessment of a person's academic skills in reading, sentence skills and math.

Accuplacer is considered a high-stakes assessment because it determines whether or not a student is placed in developmental education classes, or credit-bearing classes, in a post-secondary institution. Get more information at http://professionals.collegeboard.com/higher-ed/placement/accuplacer

NCRC (National Career Readiness Certificate)
The NCRC is affiliated with ACT and verifies to an employer that an individual has core employability skills in reading, math and locating information. For more information on the certificate visit www.act.org/certificate

NRS (National Reporting System)
The NRS is the accountability system for the adult education program. View NRS implementation guidelines.

Need Help?

Search Help
This video guide shows you how to search MnROC as a guest, how to refine your searches, and how to view the materials you've selected.

MnROC Search Video

If your search is not displaying any results, click the button to clear all selected keywords and review your filter selections. Selecting too many filters or keywords can return zero results.

Contributor Help 
If you have a problem entering your coursework as a contributor, read the Contributors Before You Start Guide.

Browser Issues 
You'll get the best results by using Internet Explorer, and may encounter display issues with other browsers. If you are having trouble with information displaying correctly in MnROC, switch to Internet Explorer.

For More Information 
For questions not covered by any of the resource materials, contact a MnROC administrator at 651-259-7595 or email mnroc.admin@state.mn.us