Featured Books

Abbreviations: V  - violence, L – offensive language, S - sexual situations.

June 2015

  • Weekend Program Books

    Your Personal World (Saturday at 1 p.m.) is airing Down Size, by Ted Spiker

    For the Younger Set (Sunday at 11 a.m.) is airing The Eye of Minds, by James Dashner

    Poetic Reflections (Sunday at noon) is airing Gabriel, by Edward Hirsch and Blue Horses, by Mary Oliver

    The U.S. and Us (Sunday at 4 p.m.) is airing Minneapolis Madams, by Penny A. Petersen and Stolen from the Garden, by William Swanson

  • Chautauqua: Tuesday - Saturday 4 a.m.

    The Dylanologists, Nonfiction by David Kinney, 2014. 9 Br. Began May 26. Though he wishes it did not exist, Bob Dylan is followed by a fanatical fan base. L- Read by Natasha DeVoe. 

    The Republic of Imagination, Nonfiction by Azar Nafisi, 2014. 13 Br. Begins June 9. At a time of narrowing expectations of what students should be taught, Nafisi urges us to rediscover the America of our literature. Read by Rachael Freed.

    How We Got to Now, Nonfiction by Steven Johnson, 2014. 9 Br. Begins June 26. Innovations over the centuries included six key technologies of modern life. Coming from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs, they had unintended historical consequences. Read by Yelva Lynfield.

  • Past is Prologue: Monday - Friday 9 a.m.

    The Court-Martial of Paul Revere, Nonfiction by Michael Greenburg, 2014. 10 Br. Began May 25. The debacle of the Penobscot Expedition ruined Paul Revere’s reputation, which wasn’t restored until Longfellow wrote his poem eighty years later. Read by Jan Anderson. 

    The Secret History of Wonder Woman, Nonfiction by Jill Lepore, 2014. 11 Br. Begins June 8. The origin of one of the most iconic superheroes contains a family story and crucial history of twentieth-century feminism. Wonder Woman’s creator was William Moulton Marston, who was influenced by early suffragists and feminists. Read by Judy Woodward.

    Chaucer’s Tale, Nonfiction by Paul Strohm, 2014. 9 Br. Begins June 23. Chaucer had lived a comfortable life in London, writing for a small audience of friends and supporting himself with a bureaucratic job. But eventually he went into exile in Kent, where he began to write for the public and for posterity. Read by Esmé Evans.

  • Bookworm: Monday - Friday 11 a.m.

    The Goddess of Small Victories, Fiction by Yannick Grannec, 2014. 15 Br. Begins June 1. Mathematician Kurt Godel’s widow, Adele, is holding onto his records and refuses to let his colleagues have them. Anna Roth is assigned to befriend her to retrieve the documents, but finds her own life changes in the process. Read by Julie Bolton.

    I Refuse, Fiction by Per Petterson, 2015. 8 Br. Begins June 22. Thirty-five years ago, Tommy and Jim were everything to each other. But a single incident set them on divergent paths. Now they meet again and wonder if there is anything left to unite them. Read by Don Gerlach. 

  • The Writer’s Voice: Monday - Friday 2 p.m.

    The Calling, Nonfiction by Barry Blanchard, 2014. 16 Br. Begins June 1. With heart-pounding descriptions of avalanches and treacherous ascents, Barry Blanchard chronicles his transformation from a poor Native American/white kid from the wrong side of the tracks to one of the most respected alpinists in the world. L, S - Read by Bob Malos.

    Breaking the Code, Nonfiction by Pat Matter and Chris Omodt, 2014. 9 Br. Begins June 23. A highly respected Hell’s Angels president and an honest, hard-working cop were on different paths until their worlds collided. L - Read by Dan Sadoff.

  • Choice Reading: Monday - Friday 4 p.m.

    Land of Dreams, Fiction by Kate Kerrigan, 2014. 10 Br. Began May 19. When Ellie’s son, Leo, runs away to Hollywood, Ellie follows with the rest of the family. Read by Holly Sylvester.

    The Lobster Kings, Fiction by Alexi Zentner, 2014. 11 Br. Begins June 2. The Kings family has lived on Loosewood Island for three hundred years. Now, Woody Kings is the leader of the lobster fishing community and his daughter stands to inherit the crown. S - Read by Pat Lelich.

    The Paris Winter, Fiction by Imogen Robertson, 2014. 13 Br. Begins June 17. Maud thinks her solution is at hand when she becomes a live-in companion for a young woman. But she discovers the woman is an opium addict and her brother has an ominous air of intrigue. She is soon caught up in their world of deception and revenge. Read by Michelle Juntunen.

  • PM Report: Monday - Friday 8 p.m.

    Shadow Government, Nonfiction by Tom Engelhardt, 2015. 8 Br. Began May 26. We no longer live in a national security state but a global security one. Read by John Holden.

    Landslide, Nonfiction by Jonathan Darman, 2014. 15 Br. Begins June 8. The mid 1960s were a time of both opportunity and anxiety; Americans were unsure about the future. In three turbulent years two very different visions of the future were put forth by two men. Read by Art Nyhus.

    Just Mercy, Nonfiction by Bryan Stevenson, 2014. 12 Br. Begins June 29. Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, who was sentenced to die for a murder he insisted he didn’t commit. Read by Chris Colestock.

  • Night Journey: Monday - Friday 9 p.m.

    Dry Bones in the Valley, Fiction by Tom Bouman, 2014. 11 Br. Begins June 1. Henry’s life as the lone policeman in Wild Thyme was spent hunting and fishing. But gas drilling has brought new wealth and a host of drug problems. When a stranger turns up dead, his search for the killer will open old wounds. Read by Neil Bright.

    Pardon the Ravens, Fiction by Alan Hruska, 2015. 11 Br. Begins June 16. Young lawyer Alec Brno gets the opportunity to try a huge fraud case. But he risks it all when he falls for a young woman whose estranged husband is the criminal mastermind behind Alec's case. V, L - Read by Don Lee.

  • Off the Shelf: Monday - Friday 10 p.m.

    A History of the Future, Fiction by James Howard Kunstler, 2014. 13 Br. Begins June 1. In a future America, people are doing what they can to get by, pursuing a simpler existence. In Union Grove, New York, people are preparing for Christmas when Daniel Earle arrives back home after two years exploring what is left of the US. Read by Dan Kuechenmeister.

    The Silkworm, Fiction by Robert Galbraith, 2014. 18 Br. Begins June 18. When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife thinks he might have just gone off on his own for a bit. But he’s written a manuscript with poison-pen portraits of everyone he knows and there are a lot of people who want to silence him. L - Read by Eileen Barratt.

  • Potpourri: Monday - Friday 11 p.m.

    A Deadly Wandering, Nonfiction by Matt Richtel, 2014. 14 Br. Began May 18. A fatal car accident caused by a texting driver exemplifies the challenge of technological distractions. Read by Chris Colestock.

    Thomas Jefferson’s Crème Brulée, Nonfiction by Thomas J. Craughwell, 2013. 7 Br. Begins June 8. In 1784, Thomas Jefferson asked one of his slaves, nineteen-year-old James Hemings, to travel with him to Paris to learn the art of French cooking. In exchange for his cooperation, Jefferson would grant his freedom. Read by Sally Browne.

    Subway to California, Nonfiction by Joseph di Prisco, 2014. 14 Br. Begins June 17. In 1960, the Di Prisco family fled Brooklyn and the FBI, ending up in California. Joe’s father was a small-time member of a crew of bookmakers. Joe, however, wasn’t called to a life of crime, and sought a different life. L - Read by Peter Danbury.

  • Good Night Owl: Monday - Friday midnight

    Betrayed, Fiction by Lisa Scottoline, 2014. 11 Br. Begins June 1. Lawyer Judy Carrier suspects foul play when Iris, her aunt’s housekeeper and best friend, is found dead of a heart attack. The circumstances leave Judy with more questions than answers, and never before has murder struck so close to home. Read by Sue McDonald. 

    Close My Eyes, Fiction by Sophie McKenzie, 2013. 14 Br. Begins June 16. Geniver has never recovered from the stillborn birth of a daughter eight years ago. Her husband, Art, is eager to have another child and to move on. Then a woman claims that Gen’s baby had been born alive and was taken away by the doctor and given to someone else, and that her husband was in on the scheme. Read by Joy Fogarty.

  • After Midnight: Tuesday - Saturday 1 a.m.

    The Darkest Part of the Forest, Fiction by Holly Black, 2015. 11 Br. Began May 19. Hazel always thought she knew how to stop the faeries. L,S - Read by Kristi Sullivan.

    Wildalone, Fiction by Krassi Zourkova, 2015. 14 Br. Begins June 3. Away from her European homeland for her freshman year at college, Thea falls into a romantic entanglement with Rhys and his equally handsome and mysterious brother, Jake. She finds herself drawn into a sensual mythic underworld as irresistible as it is dangerous. L - Read by Pat Kovel-Jarboe.

    Princess of Thorns, Fiction by Stacey Jay, 2014. 11 Br. Begins June 23. As they race to prevent the fulfillment of a prophecy foretelling the end of life, Aurora and Niklaas learn there are worse things than old curses. Aurora can only love platonically, and Niklaas is looking for her but not in the male guise Aurora wears. Read by Janelle Mattson.

July 2015

  • Weekend Program Books

    Your Personal World (Saturday at 1 p.m.) is airing Down Size, by Ted Spiker

    For the Younger Set (Sunday at 11 a.m.) is airing The Eye of Minds, by James Dashner, and The Song of the Quarkbeast, by Jasper Fforde

    Poetic Reflections (Sunday at noon) is airing Blue Horses, by Mary Oliver, and The Last Two Seconds, by Mary Jo Bang

    The U.S. and Us (Sunday at 4 p.m.) is airing Stolen from the Garden, by William Swanson

  • Chautauqua: Tuesday - Saturday 4 a.m.

    How We Got to Now, Nonfiction by Steven Johnson, 2014. 9 Br. Began June 26. Innovations over the centuries included six key technologies of modern life: refrigeration, clocks, lenses, water purification, recorded sound, and artificial light. Created by amateurs, and entrepreneurs, they had unintended consequences. Read by Yelva Lynfield.


    The Big Ratchet, Nonfiction by Ruth DeFries, 2014. 9 Br. Begins July 9. Human history is a story of continual innovations, enabling us to surpass existing limits, even as they create new problems in their wake. Understanding the cycle will show how we reached this point in our history and how we might survive it. Read by Lannois Neely.


    More Awesome than Money, Nonfiction by Jim Dwyer, 2014. 14 Br. Begins July 22. Four computer nerd undergrads wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control the information they shared, instead of surrendering their privacy to big businesses like Facebook. Their project was called Diaspora. Read by Chris Colestock.

  • Past is Prologue: Monday - Friday 9 a.m.

    Hell before Breakfast, Nonfiction by Robert H. Patton, 2014. 15 Br. Begins July 6. During the decades when America was emerging as a great power and the monarchies of Europe battled for dominance, war correspondents led the most romantic and thrilling of lives. They were correspondents who saw the world and broke the story. Read by Bonnie Smith-Yackel.

    The Story of the Jews, Nonfiction by Simon Schama, 2014. 22 Br. Begins July 27. The Jewish world has been immersed in and imprinted by the peoples among whom they have dwelled, from Egyptians to Greeks, from Arabs to Christians. Their story, therefore, is everyone’s story. Read by Audray Rees.

  • Bookworm: Monday - Friday 11 a.m.

    What the Lady Wants, Fiction by Renée Rosen, 2014. 13 Br. Begins July 2. Socialite Delia Spencer’s world changed the night of Chicago’s Great Fire when she met Marshall Field. He reopened his dry goods store, transforming it into a palace of a department store. Read by Pat Lelich.

    Secret of a Thousand Beauties, Fiction by Mingmei Yip, 2015. 8 Br. Begins July 21. Spring Swallow was promised in marriage before she was born. When the groom died before the wedding, she was ordered to become a ghost bride, meaning she would be little more than a servant to her in-laws. Refusing to accept her fate, Spring Swallow flees. Read by Nancy Felknor.

  • The Writer’s Voice: Monday - Friday 2 p.m.

    Was Blind, but Now I See, Nonfiction by Jim Hindman, 2015. 5 Br. Begins July 6. Jim Hindman, entrepreneur and founder of Jiffy Lube International faced the biggest challenge of his life at age 57 when he was diagnosed with macular degeneration. Throughout his career, nothing prepared him for the impact it would have on his life. Read by Art Nyhus.

    Misdiagnosed, Nonfiction by Nika C. Beamon, 2014. 8 Br. Begins July 13. Nika Beamon suffered from an auto-immune disease that her medical professionals found baffling. For two decades, she navigated through the medical labyrinth searching for answers to her condition. S - Read by Yelva Lynfield.

    The Daring Heart of David Livingstone, Nonfiction by Jay Milbrandt, 2014. 10 Br. Begins July 23. The quest for the source of the Nile will forever be associated with David Livingstone, and his adventures in the name of scientific ambition make for a compelling story. But the most overlooked part of David Livingstone’s life is his contribution to the abolition of the slave trade. Read by Bonnie Smith-Yackel.

  • Choice Reading: Monday - Friday 4 p.m.

    Under the Wide and Starry Sky, Fiction by Nancy Horan, 2014. 20 Br. Begins July 6. Leaving her philandering husband, Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne takes her children to Belgium to start a new life. But tragedy strikes and Fanny and her children go to a quiet artists’ colony in France where she meets Robert Louis Stevenson. Read by Laura Rohlik.

  • PM Report: Monday - Friday 8 p.m.

    Just Mercy, Nonfiction by Bryan Stevenson, 2014. 12 Br. Began June 29. Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, who was sentenced to die for a murder he insisted he didn’t commit. Read by Chris Colestock.

    Latino America, Nonfiction by Matt Barreto and Gary Segura, 2014. 11 Br. Begins July 15. The U.S. is undergoing a substantial and irreversible shift in identity. So are the Latinos whose populations are responsible for this change. Barreto and Segura show how Latinos have transformed the country politically and socially. Read by Tony Lopez.


    Bad Paper, Nonfiction by Jake Halpern, 2014. 7 Br. Begins July 30. Through the story of a couple debt collectors, Jake Halpern tells of high-pressure call centers and the selling of social security numbers and account information. The world of consumer debt collection is unregulated and operators make unwarranted threats and collect debts that are not theirs. L - Read by Nualle Schallenberger.

  • Night Journey: Monday - Friday 9 p.m.

    Windigo Island, Fiction by William Kent Krueger, 2014. 13 Br. Begins July 1. Private Investigator Cork O’Connor investigates the disappearance of a teenage girl, Mariah, and the death of her friend who the Natives consider killed by Windigo or a vengeful spirit, Michi Peshu. Cork believes the culprits are sex traffickers and he vows to find Mariah. L – Read by Mike Piscitelli.

    The Empire of Night, Fiction by Robert Olen Butler, 2014. 15 Br. Begins July 20. Christopher Marlowe Cobb, known as Kit, is a spy working undercover at a castle on the Kentish coast, owned by a suspected mole, Sir Albert Stockman. Kit’s mother is also a spy, Isabel Cobb, and a famous stage actress, one of whose fans is this same Sir Albert Stockman. L - Read by John Mandeville.

  • Off the Shelf: Monday - Friday 10 p.m.

    The Silkworm, Fiction by Robert Galbraith, 2014. 18 Br. Began June 18. When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife thinks he might have just gone off on his own for a bit. But he’s written a manuscript with poison-pen portraits of everyone he knows and there are a lot of people who want to silence him. L – Read by Eileen Barratt.

    O, Africa!, Fiction by Andrew Lewis Conn, 2014. 14 Br. Begins July 14. In the summer of 1928, twins Micah and Izzy Grand are at the pinnacle of their moviemaking careers, when Micah’s vices catch up to him. As danger looms, they go to Africa to compile stock footage of flora and fauna, and to film a movie. Instead, they discover themselves. Read by John Holden.

  • Potpourri: Monday - Friday 11 p.m.

    Subway to California, Nonfiction by Joseph di Prisco, 2014. 14 Br. Began June 17. In 1960, the Di Prisco family fled Brooklyn and the FBI, ending up in California. Joe’s father was a small-time member of a crew of bookmakers. Joe, however, wasn’t called to a life of crime, and sought a different path. L – Read by Peter Danbury.

    Gloria Swanson, Nonfiction by Stephen Michael Shearer, 2013. 21 Br. Begins July 7. Gloria Swanson was Hollywood’s first successful glamour queen, but her role in Sunset Boulevard overshadowed the true story of her life. She was a star in the 1920s, but through her business acumen, was able to extend her career more than sixty years. Read by Audray Rees.

  • Good Night Owl: Monday - Friday midnight

    Nora Webster, Fiction by Colm Tóibín, 2014. 12 Br. Begins July 6. Nora Webster was widowed in her forties with four children and not enough money. She lost the love of her life, Maurice, who rescued her from the world in which she was born and which she may be drawn back to. L,S – Read by Judy Woodward.

    Citizens Creek, Fiction by Lalita Tademy, 2014. 15 Br. Begins July 22. Born into slavery in Alabama in 1810 and sold to a Creek Indian chief, Cow Tom possessed an extraordinary ability to master languages. As the U.S. expanded westward, he became a key translator between his Creek master and military generals. L - Read by Joan Sanaker.

  • After Midnight: Tuesday - Saturday 1 a.m.

    Princess of Thorns, Fiction by Stacey Jay, 2014. 11 Br. Began June 23. As they race to prevent the fulfillment of a prophecy foretelling the end of life, Aurora and Niklaas learn there are worse things than old curses. Aurora can only love platonically, and Niklaas is looking for her but not in the male guise Aurora wears. Read by Janelle Mattson.

    The Book of Strange New Things, .