Occupations in Demand (OID)

The Occupations in Demand tool allows you to find out what jobs are in high demand in each region of the state. The typical wage, long-term employment outlook, training (or degree) required and schools that offer training programs for each occupation are also listed.

Select this link to use the tool


About Occupations in Demand

Description: Occupations in Demand (OID) lists current career opportunities in a region as determined by regularly updated local labor market data. The OID list for a region is the group of occupations that rank highest on a Current Demand Indicator, which measures short-term demand for jobs locally.

Data sources: The OID Current Demand Indicator is calculated on the basis of the following data sources:

  • Job Vacancy Survey
  • Occupational Employment Statistics
  • Unemployment Insurance claims

In addition, OID lists also include future occupational outlooks supplied by the Employment Outlook program, wage data from Occupational Employment Statistics, information on the typical training (or degree) required as determined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and details on related training programs offered around the state. Furthermore, each occupational code is linked to Minnesota-specific career exploration resources online at www.iseek.org/careers/index.html.

How is it used?

  • By job seekers and employment counselors for job search and career planning.
  • By counselors to allocate training resources more efficiently, therefore benefiting the regional economy.
  • For developing regional labor market profiles.

How is the data formatted? Viewable data tables that can be sorted by any of the variables displayed. Files are downloadable.

Definitions: Occupations are classified using the U.S. Department of Labor’s Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) typology. Only annual salary statistics are presented.

Program notes: Projection information displayed alongside with OID regional lists applies to planning areas. Only three economic development regions coincide with a Planning Area: EDR 3 (corresponding to the Northeast Planning Area), EDR10 (corresponding to the Southeast Planning Area), and EDR11 (Metro Planning Area).


Methodology

What is OID?
Occupations in Demand (OID) are currently available career opportunities in a local labor market as determined by local labor market data. A demand score blends Job Vacancy Survey (JVS) data, Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) data, and Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims data.

Job vacancies for the Economic Development Region (EDR):
There are thirteen EDRs and six planning regions in the state. A high number of vacancies will increase the occupation’s demand score.

Number of existing jobs from Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) in the EDR:
Having a high number of jobs in a given region increases the demand score for that occupation.

Number of UI weeks claimed:
A high number of Unemployment Insurance weekly claims will reduce the occupation’s demand score.

Seasonality in the occupation as measured by the Job Vacancy Survey:
A high share of vacancies that are reported as temporary will tend to pull the score down because it indicates seasonality and/or the predominance of short-term job opportunities in the field.

The OID list for a region is the group of occupations that rank highest, given all these factors. Lists are updated on a semi-annual basis for the thirteen Economic Development Regions (EDRs). All Workforce Service Areas (WSAs) fit into an EDR.

Because the statistics are not perfect and to make use of more recent information that the statistics may not take into account, Regional Analysts review lists for their regions and edit them based on local knowledge. For example, a regional analyst may have first-hand knowledge of a business opening shortly which will result in numerous job opportunities not yet captured by the Job Vacancy Survey.

In addition to the demand score, OID web presentation also include future occupational outlook information supplied by the Employment Projections program, median wage data from OES, and the typical training (or degree) required as determined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as well as a link to information on related training programs offered around the state. This information helps the user determine if the job is attractive and what skills or training might be necessary to obtain it.

How is OID Calculated?
OID ranks occupations on the basis of the following variables:

Variable

Data Source

Employment

Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) 2009

Job Vacancies

Job Vacancy Survey last 4 rounds from Q2 2008 to Q4 2009

Unemployment Insurance Weeks Claimed (not initial but continued claims)

Unemployment Insurance administrative data from 2009 to 2010.

Seasonality expressed as:

Vacancies reported as Temporary or Seasonal
Total vacancies with responses to this question

Job Vacancy Survey last 4 rounds from Q2 2008 to Q4 2009

Formula:
EMPshare + JVshare - UIshare – SEASONshare

Where:
-Employment Share for an individual occupation is the occupation’s share of total EDR employment

-EDR JV Share for an individual occupation represents the occupation’s vacancies as a share of all vacancies reported within the EDR over the last two years.

-UI Share for an individual occupation is the occupation’s share of total weeks of Unemployment Insurance claimed in the EDR over the last two years.


-Seasonality Share has been calculated as follows:

Occupation’s % seasonality * Occupation’s EDR employment share
Average % seasonality for all occupations


This score is preceded by a minus sign because it is used to reduce an occupation’s short-term demand based on the level of seasonality within that occupation.

Questions?

More about the data: Additional information about the OID program can be addressed to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development at 651-259-7392 or deed.lmi@state.mn.us.